If it ain’t Dutch… [Continued]

I. Portuguese for “peaceful, or gentle…”

I’ve heard it said over the years that “Northern European’s don’t do sexy.” Yachts, that is. I don’t know if that’s ever been true – after all, these are the people who brought us Zeelanders, as sexy a yacht as any I’ve seen come out of Italy:

 

But it certainly ain’t true now! I am pleased and proud to announce the fourth and last leg of The Fog Warning’s new “Group Holland” initiative:

The Sossego [Sah-SAY-go] Comfort  22


 

The Sossego line of go-fast aluminum yachts are built by the Gebroeders van Enkhuizen yard. Sossego  – a beautiful word (do what I did – get a native Portuguese speaker to say it. It pours out like melted butter). The Enkhuizen’s are right next door to the Feadship plant, in Makkum, and share many of the same subcontractors. They’ve long been known for launching some of the finest aluminum yachts (both sail and power) in all of Europe. This one, hull # 3 in the line, is as fine an example of a performance flybridge as I’ve ever run.

 

 

Running this fine yacht in the North Sea at maximum RPM, flying along at 36 knots, I was stunned at her sound engineering. I measured  just 60 decibels at full speed. If you can hear her twin MAN 1550’s in this sea trial, your ears are a lot better than mine!

It became clear to me after a couple of day in the factory that the Sossego is what you get when you combine the best of ever-skillful designer Frank Mulder’s efforts with a yard that devotes itself to empirical and uncompromising engineering, flawless construction methods, and a fine aesthetic sense:

 

 

She is currently making her way to her winter harbor in Majorca. I’d be happy to meet you there and show this fine yacht to you. Until that time, the best look at her is:

  • This clip (with some great running shots) from Dutch TV:

 Sossego Interview

  • And this virtual tour. Select “FOTO”for the best experience:

Click for Interior and exterior virtual tours!

You can see the full specifications on The Fog Warning Yachtworld page, here:

The Sossego Yachworld Listing

But… stay tuned and buckle your seatbelt, loyal readers, for some exciting information about her big sister, the Sossego 30M:

 

Meanwhile, as always, if you have any questions or comments, just launch that flare! Or find me at FLIBS at the Zeelander dock….

II. Zeelander at Fort Lauderdale

Just check this out….

Now, come check her out in person! I’ll have the latest Z55 at the Fort Lauderdale boat show. She’s a 2,000 hp beast (if a beast can be this beautiful) that hits 42 knots!

She and I will be in the Green Zone of the show – that’s on the north side, not far from the bridge. Specifically:

Green Zone, HOF FD 37A

 

I don’t have to tell you how big FLIBS is. Call me if you get lost!

I now have some big news on the smaller Zeelanders – The 44. I have two of them (that’s 88 feet of Z, people) available for immediate delivery from the factory. To give you a sense of scale, here’s a 44 next to her big sister:

 

I find that the Z44 shares that great mix of indoor/outdoor space with the Z55. I ran a Z44 in Holland last month with eight people aboard, and it swallowed us all up quite nicely.

The best way to get a sense of her spaciousness is through this virtual tour:

Zeelander 44 Virtual Tour

If you are looking for a wonderful little yacht right now, you have your choice of the Black Sable or Bentley Blue models:

 

Call me (or even better, see me aboard the Z55 at the show) and I’ll take you through the options and pricing for these two wonders. Trust me, one of them belongs at your dock this season. Let’s find a way to make that happen….

III. Long Island Yachts Runabout 40

I’m excited to talk with your today about the queen of Long Island Yachts’ fleet, their Runabout 40:

 

As I mentioned last month, Long Island Yachts of Rotterdam, Holland has a deep admiration for the looks and performance of classic American downeast designs. After great success in Europe – over 80 boats sold – they now come home to the country that inspired their classic designs.

I ran this boat in Holland last month, and found she delivers a nice balance of space both above deck and below. Below decks, you’ll find accommodations for four – a master cabin with an island bed, and the guest cabin with twin berths. You’ll also find a seating area, and a surprisingly spacious bathroom with separate shower area.

The entire interior is very nicely finished in bright teak and an attractive off-white finish.

 

 

The helm station offers a purely classic design, but with a state of the art dashboard:

 

 

The dinette is well protected by the windscreen, with a functional galley opposite. The spacious aft cockpit offers seating for six.

The deep V hull of the Long Island 40 Runabout is designed to travel comfortably at high speed. Her standard engines are straight shaft twin Yanmar 315’s. Upgrading to the optional twin Volvo IPS 600 enables the boat to reach speeds of over 40 knots.

You can see the full specifications (and her attractive pricing) on The Fog Warning Yachtworld page, here:

The 40 Runabout Yachtworld Listing

You will also find there exciting information on the rest of the Long Island Yachts line:

Including their 33’s:

 

Their 28:

 

And their 25’s:

 

 

 

As always, if you’d like to hear the full story, just launch that flare (and find me at the show).

III. All Work and No Play…

On the way back from the Annapolis Show I stopped in DC to see an exhibit I first read about in the Wall Street Journal. The National Gallery has put on a stunning exhibit entitled:

Water, Wind, and Waves: Marine Paintings from the Dutch Golden Age

I found it just exceptional, of interest to anyone who loves boats and boating. I learned that in the 17th century,  maritime art for the Dutch was their “Hollywood” entertainment. Here are some examples of what you’ll see (but only if you hurry! The show closes on November 25th):

 

My new best friend, Miss Google Analytics, tells me that of all the pages I’ve published on The Fog Warning, month in and month out the number one hit is …. “About The Painting.”  That’s the rather academic video atop my home page that educates us all on Winslow Homer and his iconic painting (and mine) – The Fog Warning.

Given that popularity, I am compelled to post his as well, the National Gallery’s talk on this wonderful and entertaining exhibition. Enjoy!

IV. Let’s Be Careful Out There

About fifteen years ago I was representing a small Turkish builder called Dereli Yachts. They build a neat jet boat called The Daytripper 40, and I sold my share:

If you watch the video carefully, you’ll note two things:

  • She was a truly beautiful yacht.
  • And, she ran sort of bow up.

Visibility was an issue here.  One client of mine solved the problem by adding a full blown tuna tower, with a second helm station twenty feet off the deck! But I found one night on Long Island Sound that in zero visibility weather, trim is of secondary importance.

My job was to bring the D40 from Huntington N.Y. to Newport RI for the boat show. But I got stuck waiting for an engine part, and couldn’t leave with the rest of the fleet. At 6pm I began the 120 mile run to Newport, budgeting four hours at 30 knots. Then the squalls hit….

An hour after sunset, heavy rain and wind made it an entirely instruments-only delivery. The rain was hard enough that the automatic tuning of the radar wasn’t optimal, and I had to play around with my own settings. It made no difference at all (there be nothing to see) but I left the windshield wipers running the whole time. More about that later, my friends…

Fortunately,  radar showed that there weren’t many boats out on Long Island Sound that night. A scattered freighter or two, and the ferries out of Port Jefferson and Orient Point. But running on full instruments,  those blips got every ounce of my attention. In the end, at 15 knots, it took about six hours to get to the dock in Newport. I was a little frazzled.

Returning to the boat early the next morning,, I found that sometime during the trip I had thrown the helm-side wiper blade. The steel retaining clip, arching back and forth hour after hour, had etched a perfect (an deep) half-moon scratch in the glass. Trust me, it looked a lot worse than this:

The entire windshield had to be replaced. A very expensive lesson.

It’s not like running those wipers added any value. We’ve all seen, even in daylight, how heavy rain (or seas) overwhelms most wipers.  This is why I’m a big fan of what you’ll find on commercial boats (and more and more on expedition yachts): Bladed high-speed circular ports. These suckers will cut through anything:

Looking back on this trip now, and remembering how stressed I was tracking those ferries,  I wish my radar had a MARPA option. MARPA was an expensive “black box” option (I can’t even find a picture of it now)  allowing you to mark and track individual targets over ever-changing collision courses. It was clunky, and it required some training and practice to use it effectively.  But at the time it was state of the art.

When I started selling boats in the late 90’s there were still plenty of older boats with green screen radars. Remember this?

These  were limited in the their displays (split screens were a generation or two away) and integrated badly (if at all) with chart plotters. Which is why delivery captains always had one of these in their travel bag:

 

Yup, you tracked targets changing vectors with a grease pencil, marking up the radar screen. Post-It notes helped for range and distance:

A pilot told me that air traffic control back in that era wasn’t much more sophisticated. Here’s how they did it:

Well, we’ve come a long way, baby!

On a foggy morning last month in Holland I helped take a stunning Dutch explorer yacht out into the North Sea. The dykes in the area were 14 feet high, and significant traffic control was necessary to safely approach the locks. I counted twenty targets  converging upon the lock passageway, over 270 degrees of horizon. Plus, of course, a steady stream of traffic was coming in from the other side. But collision avoidance is much easier now than it used to be.

The explorer was equipped with Raymarine’s new Quantum 2 CHIRP radar, with Doppler processing. Every single target was automatically identified and tracked, with clear indications of whether they were heading towards or away from us. Here’s how it works:

All I’ll say is I wish I had this on that squall-heavy trip to Newport!

OK, one and all, I’ve got a plane to catch. You know the drill – need anything, dig out your flare gun. And let me show you the Zeelander 55 at the show. I will be there full time, except for scheduled appointments to show The Baron, my Vicem 72 Flybridge at her dock in Miami:

 

Friday appointments are all booked. But call me about availability over the show weekend. She is worth seeing!

Ciao for now,

Big Wave Dave

 

 

The Long Island Runabout 40 (and more)

The Long Island Yachts Runabout 40

Long Island Yachts of Rotterdam, Holland has a deep admiration for the looks and performance of classic American downeast designs. After great success in Europe – over 80 boats sold – they now come home to the country that inspired their classic designs.

The Long Island 40 Runabout, the queen of their fleet, delivers a well-worked balance of space above deck and below. Her open bridge deck and large cockpit area are designed to deliver open boating in comfort and style. Below decks, you’ll find accommodations for four – a master cabin with an island bed, and the guest cabin with twin berths. You’ll also find a seating area, and a surprisingly spacious bathroom with separate shower area.

The entire interior is pleasingly finished in bright teak and an attractive off-white finish.

The helm station offers a purely classic design, but with a state of the art dashboard:

The dinette is well protected by the windscreen, with a functional galley opposite. The spacious aft cockpit offers seating for six.

The deep V hull of the Long Island 40 Runabout is designed to travel comfortably at high speed. Her standard engines are straight shaft twin Yanmar 315’s. Upgrading to the optional twin Volvo IPS 600 enables the boat to reach speeds of over 40 knots.

The full Long Island Yachts line at work:

Including their 33’s:

Their 28:

And their 25’s:

As always, if you’d like to hear the full story, just launch that flare!

If it ain’t Dutch, it ain’t much!

I’ve been traveling the breadth of Holland for most of September.  Having bounced around between Amsterdam, Rotterdam, and that booming metropolis of Urk (no, that’s not a typo) for weeks on end,  I return with fascinating tales and stunning boats for you. So grab a Heineken or two and settle down for the story.

I was invited to the Netherlands by a consortium of Dutch builders eager to establish (or improve) their beachheads on our side of the pond. I got up close and personal looks at over two hundred new yachts, and met with over a dozen builders.

I found there’s a lot of truth behind the old “If it ain’t Dutch…” joke. The Dutch truly have a unique relationship with the sea. The hard fact is that most of their country is below sea level, so they don’t have much choice!  Crawling through their yachts, I found some of the best engineering on the planet. I feel very strongly that we need this level of engineering in our harbors, too. Which is why I am so thrilled to now be representing three of Holland’s premier yacht builders in America!

I. First, Zeelander Yachts

Zeelander has been selling their fine yachts (including the hot one cruising through that cup of  coffee, above) in the USA since 2010. Their Z44 and Z55 models are well established on both coasts. I think you’ll understand why this year their best seller is their Z55:

 

 

 

 

 

 

As stunning as they are to the eye, what’s going on behind the scenes – from their hull design and uncompromising standards of soundproofing to their impressively laid out systems – is even more impressive. You can see what I mean by meeting me aboard their latest Z55 (a triple IPS 45 knot boat!) at the Fort Lauderdale Boat Show (from October 31st  through November 4th).  I know my clients and loyal readers. So I know you will love this boat.

Be forewarned that I’ll be divulging some Zeelander secrets at the show. You can hear some advance news about Zeelander’s new Corniche 55:

and their under-construction  Zeelander 72:

And if that is not enough, I will have details on what to me is a pinnacle of avant-garde engineering: Their stunning Hybrid Drive, Rina-Green Class Plus Zeelander 164:

The artist renditions of three alternatives for its interior design will grab your attention. I am certain of it.

But to tide you over until your FLIBS vacation, here’s a cool little advance holiday for you:

II. Hartman Yachts

These are the boats that brought me to Holland this fall! It all started with a review of their Livingstone 24  in the latest issue of Passagemaker Magazine. Her classic jazz-age styling made me reach for my passport:

This 24 meter shares her lines with two larger siblings, the 34M and the 42M. Viewed as a complete series, these sketches provide the best view of Hartman’s deep dive  into classic yachts:

The Livingstone 24

 

The Livingstone 34

The Livingstone 42

I’ll be writing about this fine yacht quite a bit in the months to come, but if you can’t wait, here’s the review that sent me to Urk:

 

I’d be remiss here in not mentioning Hartman’s Explorer line, the Amundsen Series. Designed to go anywhere at almost any time, their design and overbuilt scantlings come directly from Hartman’s experience in building ocean-tested commercial freighters – boats that routinely go from Holland to the Falkland Islands, regardless of weather. Their intelligent and redundant systems will identify their 26M, 35M, and 42M yachts as true Explorer-class yachts:

Amundsen 26

 

Amundsen 34

Amundsen 42

III. Long Island Yachts

I must say, this was the big surprise of my trip to Holland:

I had not heard of Long Island Yachts, despite their oh-so-American name (they’re actually named after a very special place in the Bahamas). I was surprised (and then excited) to learn that over eighty  have sold in Holland. I find the Dutch to be a very friendly, but rather grounded people. It takes a lot to get them excited. Well, clearly these Long Island Yacht builds turn them on!

 

I firmly believe these little pocket yachts are poised to make a big splash in our harbors. Why?

  • Their designs are spot on.
  • Their build-quality is as close to flawless as I’ve seen on small yachts.
  • Their pricing is quite advantageous.

But hey, don’t just listen to me! Come see for yourself, as I’ll have a beautiful red one for you to board at the Fort Lauderdale Show. Please call me for the details.

IV. Oh Wait….

One last thing about the Fort Lauderdale Show – The Baron, my Vicem 72 brokerage listing, will be open for private viewings in nearby Miami. I will be making scheduled trips  during the show, so please call now for an appointment. For a more public viewing, here ya go:

V. Things I hate!

Welcome to a new regular feature of The Fog Warning – Things I love, and Things I Hate. This week, it’s all about the hate!

I’m often asked where the name “Big Wave Dave”  comes from. I rarely tell the story. It’s too embarrassing for a marine professional (sic) to admit.  But as The Fog Warning’s reach has expanded (with 10,000 new readers this year alone) I recognize that a good part of this growth is the boating public’s hunger for better coverage of “real world” safety issues. So in the interest of the greater good, I will overcome my embarrassments for you, my loyal readers. You owe me one.

First, some video’s that explore that brave and dangerous activity of boarding moving vessels. (Warning, don’t try this at home).

The first is about mail deliveries on the Great Lakes. In some communities mail gets delivered right to your dock. And, as you’ll see,  that mailboat don’t dawdle!

Mailboat jumper tryouts

The "mailboat jumpers" are part of a time-honored tradition that helps put Lake Geneva on the map. FOX6 News was there on Tuesday for tryouts for the 2018 season — and not everyone stayed dry! via.fox6now.com/a1U5Q

Posted by FOX6 News Milwaukee on Tuesday, June 12, 2018

 

And then there is this boarding exercise,  from Finland. How else would your pilot board from an ice flow? And do they pay these people enough?

 

Finally, my points are made by this hair-raising tale (it ends well):

Personally, these videos instill in me an attitude of gratitude (as new-age meditators put it). Gratitude  for the fact that the universe, in its infinite wisdom, provided for the evolution of bow rails!

After all, these too-often overlooked options keep you and yours where you’re supposed to be.

Of course many downeast-style yachts dispense with these rails altogether. Far and away the majority of Hinkley’s don’t have them. In fact, these yachts are beautiful in part because there are no stainless rails breaking up their sweeping lines. Here’s a good example of that (and bonus points if you catch the captain almost falling overboard seven seconds in):

The bow rail discussion (do I or don’t I?) is a little bit like the flybridge discussion (Do I shoot for the panoramic visibility and extra outdoor space that a flybridge offers, or the pure beauty of an express model?).  A little tangent here folks….

I was speaking with a client just last week about his dilemma. His point, and of course we all get it, is that life is too short to have a less-than-beautiful boat. And whatever visibility, functionality and outdoor space a flybridge adds, it hurts to sacrifice one’s sense of style. On the flip side, when you’re running your boat, why care what she looks like to the crowds?

There’s no right answer here, of course. But I will say that one of the things that  completely won me over to Zeelander is how beautifully they balance interior and exterior space, without sacrificing visibility.

First, the designers at Zeelander went pedal-to-the-metal in providing full panoramic view from the helm of their 55. You can see it best clicking on this virtual tour:

 

I’ve never run an express-style yacht with this kind of 360 degree visibility. From a safety perspective, I cannot say enough about it.

And then, in terms of the indoor/outdoor space issue, the Z55 is the only express-style yacht I know that offers a quantum of outdoor space comparable to a flybridge. Check out these plans:

 

With her transom hydraulically opened, her beach-sized platform spread out just above the water, her bar area windows retracted and her sunroof open, the Zeelander 55 offers four outdoor areas for you and your guests, without sacrificing any room down below. I have never seen this on an express-style yacht. Come see me at the Fort Lauderdale show and I’m happy to demonstrate at length.

Well, now back to bow rails. In my ten years with Vicem, and some $40m in boats later,  I never did a custom build without bow rails. The conversation came up quite a bit, of course. Most commonly I heard “Hinckley’s don’t got ’em, why should mine?”  But in the end, safety won out repeatedly, and every one of my clients opted to spend the $14,000+ to add bow rails. Rails, I might add, high enough to do their job. Too many rails end just above knee height, as seen here….

…putting them at the perfect fulcrum point to toss you overboard.

Let me repeat that: ….putting them at the perfect fulcrum point to……

Ten years ago I was working a 50′ yacht at a CT boat show. Her bow rails were knee-high.  A client happened to call me for some advice, so for some privacy I worked my way up to the bow, thereby becoming the object of an old industry joke:

Q: How can you tell who’s a yacht broker at a boat show?

A: He/She is  the one on their phone with their back to the crowd.

Guilty as charged.

We talked for awhile,  my phone tucked in one ear as I took some notes in my ever-present notebook. These days I use this one, and if you’d like one for note taking at the fall shows, just launch a flare and I’d be happy to send you one:

All was fine until I dropped the pen. Leaning forward, braced against the (low) rail, a gentle wave from a passing wake rocked my boat slightly. Much quicker than I can write, I instantly went from six feet above the water to five feet under, hitting the dock with my shoulder as I passed it by. Instantly, as in:

Underwater, I was immediately aware of two things:

  • Which way was up (duh, the sunlight);  and,
  • That my arm hurt like hell.

I popped up, and looked aft to the crowds on the dock. No one saw me go over, and with my head just below dock level I was pretty much invisible. I couldn’t wave (I needed my other arm to stay afloat) but I could inch my way down the dock with my one good arm. I made my way up the ladder on the boat’s swim platform.

I was reasonably sure my arm was broken, but X-rays at the ER showed it was just a bad bone bruise. Three days later I was on a plane to Istanbul to splash a new Vicem 67 Flybridge.

So yes, I’m the only one in my industry who can say I fell overboard at a boat show. My colleagues awarded me a prize – an antique kapok-style  life jacket, labelled Big Wave Dave.

I have yet to escape that name. I don’t suppose I should.

What are the lessons of this embarassing tale? I will leave you with just one, plus a classic video clip to drive the point home: Bow rails are a personal decision. There are things to be said for high, none, or very low rails. But I’ll quote Archimedes here, who said this about fine yachts with knee-high bow rails:

“Give me a lever long enough and a fulcrum on which to place it, and I shall move the world.”

Yes, I hate ’em.  And so should you. And please remember this:

Ciao for now, loyal readers. I’ll see you at FLIBS!

[You now know the saga of] Big Wave Dave