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Long Island Yachts Sportman 25 is a touring yacht built in the Netherlands.

Tom Brady Goes Dutch!

Welcome to the launch of The Fog Warning 2.0. The new website allows us to share our stories with you in more helpful and engaging ways.  You’ll find more exciting high-value content, more informative videos and special reports, and most of all the latest in compelling story-telling platforms:

 

The Fog Warning Podcast

I’m also tremendously excited to share with you how The Fog Warning has become the first in the industry to offer carbon neutral yacht ownership to our clients.

It’s all quite a story.  Enjoy the ride!

I. Tom Brady Goes Dutch

The Fog Warning’s mantra is becoming more widely recognized with every passing day. The latest “If it ain’t Dutch, it ain’t much” convert is Tampa Bay quarterback Tom Brady, who last month took delivery of his Dutch yacht – A Wajer 55:

 

Here’s the sports media’s amusing take on his choice. While these sportscasters get most of the details wrong, you can’t fault them for their excitement. Or their envy!

 

 

Long time readers of The Fog Warning know well my passion for Wajer Yachts. Pronounced “Wire“, they are still largely unknown here in the States (I believe Brady’s Wajer is just the fourth USA model). I find their quality, engineering and performance to be all I have learned to expect from the Dutch. I‘ve gotten to know the yard and its management team quite well. I’ve run these yachts in Holland, the Med and in the States, and I am exceedingly impressed. They have become quite the phenom in Europe, to the point where they pretty much own the day boat market there. Their biggest challenge has been building enough to meet demand, but their recent expansion should do the trick.

Their “entry level” offering is their W38:

 

 

And a much bigger [currently hush-hush] addition to the line will splash shortly. If you would like to hear more about Wajer, just launch a flare. I am here to help.

Interestingly, this makes Brady the second NFL quarterback to recognize the quality and value of Dutch yachts. John Elway, of Denver Bronco fame, bought a Zeelander 44 a couple of years ago. Like Brady, he keeps it in Florida:

 

Zeelander 44’s are no longer in production, but there are always a few available on the brokerage market. Last November I made my way up to Maine to see this 2013 model, currently asking $775,000:

large photo Photo 0

Just launch a flare for my observations, and feel free to check out her complete listing.

II. A Brave New World

Wajer, Zeelander, Pardo, Van Dutch, Vanquish, and of course Hinckley and Riva have essentially created their own new class of yachts. Three years ago, while selling Hinckley’s, I began calling this the “Luxury Day Boat” market. I’ve been watching this sector quite closely these last few years, proudly observing its growing market share.

While the success of this sector started and continues in Europe, it has begun to positively explode here in the States. In Florida and the Hamptons, of course (in Sag Harbor you can almost hop straight across the harbor from day boat to day boat without wetting your feet), but now the Luxury Day Boat tide is indeed spreading across America (lately, notably, the Great Lakes)!

I’m particularly excited by this because of my representation of Holland’s Long Island Yachts:

 

 

With seven models between 25 and 40 feet, I find Long Island Yachts hit the exact sweet spot of the rapidly growing Luxury Day Boat market:

 

Long Island Yachts, Holland's premier yacht builder.

The Long Island Yachts 33

 

Long Island Yachts Sportman 25 is a touring yacht built in the Netherlands.

The Long Island Yachts Sportsman 25, just delivered to her thrilled NJ owner.

 

Long Island Yachts Sportsman 28

The Long Island Yachts Sportsman 28 tours Antarctica

 

The best-selling Long Island Yachts 33

 

The Long Island 40 – with optional IPS drives

LIY is about to deliver its one-hundredth yacht in Europe. I firmly believe they will splash even bigger here in the States, and I’m putting all I have behind them. I’ve been to the the LIY factory many times, have worked closely with their design and production teams to better tailor them to the US marketplace, and I’ve run their yachts on the North Sea, the Med, and our Atlantic coast.  I find their styling, engineering and build quality to be top-notch, as well as a tremendous value in the Luxury Day Boat market.

What Long Island Yachts does better than almost anyone in the industry is merge quality with value. For example, in both their Traditional (cuddy cabin) and Sportsman (center console) lines, they deliver bow thrusters and teak decks as standard equipment.

I’ve also come to appreciate a pivotal design feature of both lines: Their shallow draft abilities. You’ll see here their fully protected underbody, perfect for exploring skinny waters from the  Chesapeake to the Bahamas:

The Long Island Sportsman 25’s underbody

Or, to safely slide over errant icebergs:

LIY 28- Antarctica

 

If you’d like to learn more about the LIY story, your timing is excellent! I present you now with Episode #1 of The Fog Warning Podcast. My interview with LIY founder Onno Laardhoven covers the LIY story at length, as well as our predictions and observations about the Luxury Day Boat market in both Europe and the USA. You can find it here:

 

The Fog Warning Podcast

 

As you can tell, I am completely thrilled and proud to represent Long Island Yachts in America. For a deeper dive into all things LIY – including pricing, options, and delivery dates – just launch a flare. And of course explore the brand new Fog Warning website.

And the same goes for my representation of Holland’s Hartman Yachts, builder of the Livingstone and Amundsen lines of explorer yachts:

 

Our commitment to carbon neutal emission standards that apply to yachts.

Hartman Yachts Livingstone 24

 

Hartman Yachts Livingstone 24

Hartman Yachts Amundsen 26

You can learn more about the Livingstone 24 in my snoozeagram, below.

III. You Snooze, You Lose

As detailed in Episode #1 of The Fog Warning Podcast,  what you have been hearing on the docks is not just hype – brokerage yachts sales have been record-setting during the pandemic. There is now a real shortage of quality brokerage boats out there. The public (and not just the traditional yachting-buying public) found that Yachting = Social Distancing. I’ve sold three brokerage yachts in the last few months, including Mahogany Rose:

*** SOLD *** Mahogany Rose – Vicem 67

*** SOLD *** Grand Banks 42

*** SOLD *** Island Gypsy Trawler

 

I’m also knee-deep in helping clients search for just the right Vicem. Check out the stunning woodwork Vicem is famous for in our just-explored Windsor Craft 36  in CT:

large photo Photo 15

 

I’ve also been carefully evaluating the considerable value in Hinckley’s early series of Picnic Boat Classics:

If you can be flexible about the wide range of jet control systems (Generation 1, 2, or 3) on these early models, there are still real opportunities to discuss. Just launch a flare!

As or my own inventory, well, there’s not a lot left. But foremost among them is this 2017 Livingstone 24:

 

 

Stunning photographs, interior plans, and a thrilling 360 degree virtual tour right HERE.

As always, just launch a flare.

IV. The Podcast and You

So why, one might ask, a podcast?

 

The Fog Warning Podcast

 

I started blogging over a decade ago, with my Vicem Blog.  And while that particular blog has been on the shelf since 2012, it still continues to rack up an enormous number of hits. Not a month goes by where I don’t receive Vicem inquiries through it. I’ve learned a lot about blogging over the years (which is why The Fog Warning now gets 10,000 readers a year). And the main lesson is this:

Knowledgeable yachtsmen and women hunger for quality content.

And with traditional publishing’s challenges (just see how skinny the boating mags have become) I’m told The Fog Warning fills a valuable need. I’ll say this: It certainly helps me sell a lot of boats ($50 million at latest count).

I recently read that podcasting today is where blogging was back in 2005, and that we are about to enter “the golden age of podcasting.”   This was on my mind when I recently met a quite knowledgeable client aboard his yacht, as he’d begun to think about selling her.

Our highly-substantive talk ran over three hours. Reflecting upon it later, I realized that however valuable a blog’s content, there are limitations to the written word. Perhaps a supporting forum (one, lets say, that you can listen to on your boat, bike or commute) could provide greater value to more people.

So there’s your answer!

I’ve got the next six months of podcasts mapped out. You can expect wide-ranging discussions with builders, designers, naval architects and brokers as we seek to answer (you’ve heard this before) the two eternal questions of yachting:

What makes a yacht great, and why? Who makes a great yacht, and how?

I also realized  that no one – not even the world’s top brokers – can tell the story of a fine yacht with the same knowledge, passion and enthusiasm as her owner.

So I am throwing the Fog Warning Podcast open to my owner’s as well. If you would like to tell the full story of your brokerage yacht to a world-wide audience of qualified yacht buyer’s, I am here to help. Please call me for the details.

V. Tom, Giselle, Me, and now You?

 

I expect that Tom and Giselle will dock their Wajer 55 at their new Indian Creek home:

Tom Brady, Gisele Bündchen Buy Miami Property

 

Frankly, I didn’t know much about Giselle before Tom bought his Wajer. But I’ve since learned a lot about her efforts to combat deforestation in the Amazon, including the planting of hundred of thousands of trees to replace those illegally cut down by loggers. I’ve done a small bit of this kind of work in the hills of eastern Haiti while building a school in the mid-2000’s:

 

And I’ve seen how quickly embattled environments can bounce back. If you give Mother Nature a chance, she fights hard! Which is in part what led me to our latest and best initiative: The Fog Warning is the first company in the industry to offer carbon neutral yacht ownership to its owners: 

  • Why? Because our quality time on the water directly depends upon the quality of our marine environments. We’ve all become aware how that environment is changing due to climate change. We see it with rising water levels at our docks, and with more extreme weather patterns inshore and off.  Most recently, the link between climate change and the rise and spread of pandemics has become increasingly clear. So I feel that our industry has a responsibility to do more to assure safe, quality yachting experiences for our owners, and for subsequent generations of yachtsmen and women.

 

  • How? Buy a yacht, new or used, from The Fog Warning and we will provide you with a carbon-neutral ownership experience. Just send us your fuel receipts at the end of your boating year, and we will buy offsetting carbon credits to make up for your fuel use.  What’s more, we will do this for as long as you own your boat. 

 

  • Who? Our first partnership is with The Ocean Foundation’s Sea Grass Grow project. By planting and nurturing coastal sea grass acreage, shorelines are preserved and additional carbon is naturally absorbed, as demonstrated here:

 

 

That’s the plan, my friends. And while I’m proud and pleased that The Fog Warning is  the first carbon-neutral dealer in the industry, nothing would make me happier than knowing we are not the last.

So please consider spreading the good word. In my experience, no one – not builders, dealers or designers – has more collective power in this industry than yacht owners. So even if you choose to buy a yacht outside of The Fog Warning,  consider asking that builder or dealer to follow The Fog Warning’s way.  They can contact us directly for the details.

Thank you! And, most importantly ……

 

 

Big Wave Dave

Stable and Able

I think I can distill down to three simple words an answer to The Fog Warning’s eternal question of yachting:

What makes a yacht great, and why?

Those three words? Stable and Able. If your yacht delivers that for you in all respects, you’ve done well. So here in unit four of Zeelander University – Your Advanced Degree in Zeelander Ownership, we will take a deep dive into how to literally support a stable and able life afloat.

Our path today covers a wide range of stabilizer options here (there are more choices than you might expect). I can pretty much guarantee you’ll trip over some things you haven’t seen elsewhere. So kick back and enjoy. 

But first, loyal readers,

I. Our summer and fall event schedule:

First, Labor Day Weekend! We will be displaying our brand new Zeelander 55 in Martha’s Vineyard that weekend, at the Harborside Inn Marina in Edgartown:

Harborside Inn Marina, Martha’s Vineyard

You can book your safe and private viewing of this fine yacht right HERE.

From there, you can find her for most of September – seven days a week – at our docks at Norwalk Cove Marina.

Norwalk Cove Marina

This wide open scheduling means that just about any time that works for you and yours will work for me and mine. Let’s make it happen!

Lastly, I am very excited to now share with you that we will be displaying the Z55 at the private Steelpointe Yacht and Charter Show from September 24th through the 27th:

Steelpointe Yacht Show, Bridgeport CT
Z44 at Steelpointe, where she quickly sold.

We displayed our Zeelander 44 at Steelpointe’s last private, invitation-only event in July. I found it to be a safe and tightly managed event, one that found a new owner for our Z44!

Building upon that success, the September event’s invitation-only platform has tickets priced at $150 each. However, I have a limited number of free guest passes, so call quickly!

Now, back to class…

II. Stable and Able, with …. Stabilizers

There are more than a few ways to stabilize a yacht. Mostly I’m going to talk about mechanical stabilizers, but out of respect for George Clooney (who I was once pleased to meet on a Bahamas Vicem 85 charter), I’ll include a discussion of [non-mechanical, fixed] paravanes.

A) Paravanes

Anyone who has seen The Perfect Storm (and I don’t know any boater who has only seen it once) will remember what happened when George Clooney lost control of Andrea Gayle’s stabilizers:

https://youtu.be/FM-wfXvcbAY

For the record, loyal readers, I’ve never been aboard a boat that rolls the way the Andrea Gayle did above. If you have, I’d love to hear your story.  

Paravanes are the oldest of four stabilization technologies used since the 1920’s, along with Flumes, Fins, and Gyros.

Also know as “birds” or “fish,” paravanes are simple, low tech, reliable, and effective at lower speeds. The physics are pretty simple: Long booms, as George Clooney so aptly wrestled with, hold the heavily weighted paravane birds out to the side, as a counterforce to a boat’s tendency to roll. You find them on commercial fishing vessels all the time, and on quality trawlers like Nordhavn’s.

In my view, If Nordhaven spec’s them, they work. 

As for their downside’s, beyond the Clooney-esque efforts it takes to deploy and retrieve them, they only work for [slower] open water passages. It would be an entangling nightmare to deploy them in traffic. I’ll also note that the bird’s drag will cost you speed and fuel efficiency.

B) Flumes 

I’ve brought my share of yachts over from Europe and Asia on the decks of container ships. There are aways delays in receiving them dockside, as Homeland Security does a very thorough job of inspecting them (radiation detectors, anyone?). I usually don’t mind the delays, as it provides a fun Keyser Söze/Usual Suspects experience.

It was on one of these kind of handover delays that I first saw a flume system. Trust me, I had no idea what I was looking at – a massive system of tanks, pumps and valves unrelated to any other system aboard:

The goal is to manage the flow of water ballast as the boat tips from side to side. Here’s how it looks in motion:

https://youtu.be/qTFJ33WiK9E

I’ll note that of all the systems discussed here today, flumes are the only one that can effectively offset fore-and-aft trim as well. I’ll be discussing that challenge in greater detail below.

C) Active Fins

Moving back into the center of our stream, we all know Active Fin stabilizers. Quality engineering from ATBT_TRAC, Naiad, and Wesmar all share the same technology: Gyroscopes sense the motion of the vessel and hydraulic actuators then quickly rotate the fins to counteract. The reaction time has decreased greatly over the years (thank you, faster micro-processors) and zero-speed devices now work quite well even at anchor.

They can be hydraulic, electric, and even compressed air powered. In all cases, a generator is required. They require less space than gyros (more below) and aftermarket installs will usually fit (although the hull and stringers may need to be be substantially beefed up).

Tried and true, but I’ll note that they are deceptively complex systems. Their [expensive] components require monitoring and regular maintenance. The list of those components is long: Engine driven hydraulic pumps, hydraulic fluid tanks, sea water circulators to cool the fluid, actuators, seals, through hulls, and more.   

I’ll also note that hydraulic cables run through and around guest cabin bulkheads are noisy beasts when those fins are moving this way and that.

There is also the added complication of yet another underwater appendage exposed to possible damage. You may remember my post The Ghosts in the Machine, which highlighted engineer’s “test-to-destruction” methods in IPS development. Well, stabilizer engineers have tested fins in exactly the same way, as shown here:

https://youtu.be/P-E0yngavV8

 

My conclusion? While there are those that say that excess drag decrease fuel efficiency and speed, I find fins are a thoroughly reliable way to deliver a stable and able yacht.

An aside on running speed: Stabilizers of all types really come into their own on [slower] displacement and semi-displacement yachts. The basic physics of laminar flow means that boats that run in the water rock-and-roll a lot more than boats that run on top of the water (i.e. planing hulls). When a planing hull climbs up and goes, much of her hull is above the surface, and is (fortunately) less unaffected by wave state. Much more on that below.

Fins, digging deeper down, work with a predictable efficiency at all speeds. It’s not commonly known, but you have to pick your optimal cruise speed up front when adding fins, in the design stage. The faster your pre-chosen optimal cruise speed is, the larger (in square feet) your installed fins must be. Fins chosen for a 30 knot cruise speed will be as much as 33% bigger than a 15 knot speed. Just saying….

D) Gyros

Now, the game-changer.

Nature may abhor a vacuum, but gyro stabilizers (like those made by Seakeeper) couldn’t live without one!

Because in that vacuum a massive ball (in the 800 pound range) spins at almost 10,000 RPM. That’s only 20% less than your average high-speed woodshop router. But it can only reach that RPM (at least in the space, current consumption and cooling capacity a yacht can reasonably deliver) in a vacuum.

The benefits are huge – When you spin that much weight, that fast, in a vacuum, you generate enormous torque. Transfer that torque (securely and directly) to a boat’s hull, all that power goes to work in eliminating roll.

How much power? Well, the smallest model, the Seakeeper 2 (found on outboards, these days), generates as much as 3,870 foot-pounds of torque. For comparison, the maximum torque a single 425-hp Cummins diesel exerts on its crankshaft is 1,050 foot-pounds. You can see the physics of its all it in action here.

Of course it wouldn’t be Zeelander University without some history. So, to quote The Talking Heads, how did we get here? Well, thru some genius, actually, in a story that proves lightning can in fact strike the same place twice. In the yachting industry, it struck Shep McKenney twice, with huge payoffs for us all.

In the early 90’s Shep was a part-owner of Hinckley Yachts. While jet drives have been used in the boating world since the 1940’s, they lacked a simple user interphase. Shep, looking at joystick controls on NASA capsules, was sure he could buy an off-the-shelf joystick solution to marry to a jet drive. When he couldn’t source them, he brought together a team of hardware developers and software engineers to build one from scratch. It was a huge financial undertaking, at a time when Hinckley was seriously struggling. He really did bet the farm. But he won, brilliantly.

Similarly, twelve years ago Shep heard about some advanced work being done in New Zealand to stabilize high speed catamaran ferries by integrating together foils, tabs, interceptors, microprocessors, and massively beefed up stringer systems. In his words:

“When I saw what the basic device was, we realized that if we could spin it in a vacuum, it would mean we could make it much more efficient and environmentally bulletproof and control it actively, and therefore get a lot more out of the basic physics of the thing.”

Today Seakeepeer owns 90% of the worldwide gyro market. In my view, they’ve earned every sale. Because with an anchored (or, as with our Zeelander 55, an IPS Dynamically Positioned) yacht full of guests in heavy rollers, no one spills their drinks.

There are some costs to gyro technology:

  • They are heavy, and costly. Call me for the details, off our Options Price List.
  • They take considerable time to reach full RPM. Even in a vacuum, it takes about 40 minutes for that 800 pound ball to spin up to 10,000 RPM. But I’m told that an iPhone app is in the works – One that would allow you to begin the warmup stage before you arrive at your dock!
  • They are large, and take up substantial space in smaller engine rooms. Once you are above 45 feet, I don’t know of a powerboat that can’t fit them in.
  • The cooling systems are mission-critical. You’ve got to stay on top of your thru-hull connections, and keep an eye on your water strainers.
  • At speed (and our Z55 reaches 42 knots) planing hulls rise out of the water high enough that they rock-and-roll much less than at rest, or at harbor speed, or than displacement or semi-displacement yachts. At those speeds, a quicker and more direct application of force helps with both athwartship and fore-and-aft trim. More to follow….

There are a ton of video’s showing Seakeepers in practice, but the truth is I’ve never found one that accurately communicates the actual seat-of-your-pants effects they deliver. For that, come with me for a sea trial aboard our brand new Zeelander 55. I’ll do my best to find us some rough water, and you and yours can feel it for yourself. I expect you will feel what I have – It’s a little like King Neptune himself reaches up from the sea floor and grabs onto your keel. I’ve done this in six foot rollers outside Port Everglades. It was a remarkable experience.

E) High Speed Trim

I’ve been building towards this, and thanks for your patience. If you read in and between the lines, I think you get why I’m such a fan of SeaKeeper technology.

Embarrassing Truth Alert: While I’m privileged to spend 200+ days a year on the water, I do get seasick (especially early in the season, pre-sea legs). Low speed offshore trolling for tuna, inshore SCUBA trips (waiting in a long line for my turn to jump overboard, amid the rock and roll) or hanging upside down in a rolling bilge, looking for an errant bolt – these things take their toll on me. Hitting the ENGAGE button on the SeaKeeper panel is my ace in the hole.

Personally, I find stabilization less critical at higher speeds. It’s more about general comfort than avoiding seasickness. But my guests may disagree. And for that I recommend a different technology:

High Speed Stabilization

You’ve seen this variously labelled over the years (ZipWake, Interceptor, Humphree). Essentially they are extremely rapid-fire, computer controlled trim tab blades, instantly adjusting for both side-to-side and fore-and-aft conditions. They really come into their own at planing speeds, exactly the point where gyro’s become less useful. Having both technologies working together is a game-changer.

Volvo Penta’s has now purchased fellow-Swedish company Humphree, allowing their IPS systems to seamlessly integrate these two technologies. That’s what we offer on our Zeelander models, and you can see it in action here:

https://youtu.be/jWHURPUKay0

F) Conclusions of the Day:

The proof is in the buttons! Do a sea trial of our Z55 with me – one where I can instantly engage/disengage both its SeaKeeper and its Interceptor systems with a touch of a button- so you can see for yourself why they are such an integral part of the joys of Zeelander ownership.

And finally, you can experience this for yourself at our Martha’s Vineyard, Norwalk, or Bridgeport events this summer. Please book your appointment right here.

Meanwhile, stay stable and able, and call me about any little thing.

Thanks, and enjoy!

Big Wave Dave

Snooze again, lose again…

I’ve got more fast-breaking developments for you, loyal friends and clients, coming in from all 32 points of the compass. That would include:

  1. Another Zeelander sale;
  2. Another new summer event where you can experience our new Zeelander 55;
  3. Another cool update on said fine yacht; and,
  4. Another Zeelander 72 opportunity.

I’m sure you are all out and about on the water, so I will keep this brief. But right off the bat, check out today’s review of our Zeelander 55 in the Robb Report:

1. A second Snoozeagram!

Yup, two snoozeagrams in two weeks! Last week I reported that Makai, our Norwalk CT Zeelander 44 listing has found her new and happy owner.

Zeelander 44

Zeelander 44

This week I am thrilled to report that her 2012 Fort Lauderdale sistership is now under contract as well.

For the moment, that exhausts our east coast inventory of Z44 listings. However, there are two Z44’s for sale in California:

Zeelander 44 – Harvest Moon
  • Blush, a 2012 model listing for $575,000:
Zeelander 44 – Blush

If you are a West Coast boater, you can be cruising around in just a few weeks. If you are East Coast, I recommend you call me quickly (lest you end up on the wrong side of my next snoozeagram).

Over the years I’ve trucked a veritable small fleet of sold yachts cross-country, this way and that, and I’d be happy to take you through the in’s-and-out’s of the costs and procedures. And, as you’ve seen here on The Fog Warning, I’m intimately familiar with all things Zeelander. So just launch that flare and I’ll fill you in on the particulars.

2. Our Brand New Z55

Earlier this week I retrieved our new Zeelander 55 (at least until she becomes your new Zeelander 55) from her freighter in Newport:

https://vimeo.com/442816313
Norwalk bound…

Here’s my delivery report, short-form. By all means, if you have time, call for the longer version.

Long-time readers know I’ve been doing this for twenty years. And most of the $50m in fine yachts I’ve sold have been freighted over from Europe. So this is not (as they say) my first rodeo.

So I can say with deep context and full authority that in regard to this Zeelander 55, I have rarely seen a new yacht come in this flawlessly. I’ve spent most of this week exploring every nook and cranny, testing every system, and checking every last lightbulb. I find her as close to perfect as a new yacht can be. And, I’ll add, she features just about the best paint job I’ve ever seen. Yup, yup.

Her 108 mile run to our Norwalk docks was equally flawless:

https://vimeo.com/442818543

Between today and August 6th she’s docked at our Norwalk Cove Marina location, awaiting your private and unhurried inspection. Please call me for a viewing.

And after August 6th, buckle your seatbelts…

3. See us in Martha’s Vineyard!

Last week I shared with you the details of our Sag Harbor event, running from August 7th through the 13th at the town docks.

The foot of the Sag Harbor Town Dock

That will be quickly followed by our Montauk event, running from August 14th through the 16th at the Montauk Lake Club.

Montauk Lake Club

This week I am so excited to announce another event in Martha’s Vineyard!

You can find us at Edgartown’s elegant Harborside Inn for Labor Day Weekend, from September 5th through the 7th.

Harborside Inn, Martha’s Vineyard

All three of these events are by invitation only, and they have begun to fill up (particularly the Sag Harbor event).

Whether it be for Sag Harbor, Montauk, or Martha’s Vineyard, you can easily secure your appointment right HERE, and I urge you to do so quickly.

A Note on event safety: Long-time readers know I sign off my Fog Warning posts with one of two signatures: Either Big Wave Dave (a name given me when I fell overboard at a boat show) or Safety Dave (a name given me by my kids, in some exasperation).

All things considered, I prefer Safety Dave. And under that title I can talk a bit about our safety protocols at the coming events. We’ve been showing the Z55 in Norwalk, as well as the two Z44’s we just sold under these conditions, and we’ve figured out how to do it both safely and comfortably. Your comfort and safety is our top concern. Safety Dave wouldn’t have it any other way.

 

4. And, of course, our Z72

Last week I hinted rather broadly at a possible Zeelander 72 opportunity for you. I now have more info.

As you may recall, our next scheduled Z72 (#4) is to arrive in January 2021. She will be immediately preceded by #3 shipping this September to Florida, shown here:

Z72 September 2020 Delivery
Z72 #3, as equipped with portable beach.

For those of you in a hurry, this September delivery can now be available to you. Please call me for the details.

Well, you’ve seen here today lots of fast-moving going’s on here at Team Zeelander. There’s nothing I’d like more than to make you a member of the Zeelander family. Your first step (To quote Carol King her friend Sweet Baby James); All you gotta do is call.

https://youtu.be/6ZHdxYf-5Pk

See you in Norwalk, Sag, Montauk, or Martha’s Vineyard. Or all of the above!

Big Wave Dave

Blade Seaplane, Nantucket.

 

You Snooze, You Lose….

I’ve got an almost dizzying amount of news for you, my loyal friends and clients. So much so that I’m taking a short sabbatical from teaching Zeelander University this week. But worry not, your Master’s Degree in Advanced Zeelander Ownership will resume next with Chapter Four, entitled “Stable and Able.” That chapter will lead off with this well known and unforgettable clip, brought to you direct from George Clooney on the wildly pitching decks of the Andrea Gayle:

https://youtu.be/FM-wfXvcbAY

I. Your Snoozeagram

Yes, one and all, this is your latest in my twenty-year long line of “Snoozagrams.” I am quite pleased to report that Makai, our Zeelander 44 listing in CT, is now under contract!

Zeelander 44

If you didn’t get to see her in Norwark, worry not. It appears she will continue to spend the rest of her days in Connecticut waters.

But you do have another bite of the Zeelander apple available to you! We have her twin sister still available to you (last time I checked).

She is down in Fort Lauderdale, and you can read all about her right HERE. But phones are ringing (they really are) so I recommend you call me quickly, lest you find you are on the wrong end of my next snoozeagram.

II. Our Brand New Zeelander 55

As I blog with you today, our new Z55 is on a freighter somewhere out mid-Atlantic:

Final Loading, Rotterdam!

Courtesy of our wonderful team in Holland, here’s a video of her final (42 knot!) run from the factory to the freighter:

https://vimeo.com/438238427
Humming along….

Her next stop? Newport, this coming weekend. She will be available for sea trials at our Connecticut docks by July 29th.

By all means call me now to schedule your sea trial.

Our northern home (when we are not in Fort Lauderdale), is in Norwalk, at Norwalk Cove Marina:

Norwalk Cove Marina
Norwalk Cove Marina. If you’ve been to the Norwalk Boat Show, you’ve been there.

You’ll find us at our 150′ of docks there (right under the Sunset Grill). That’s more than enough room to dock the Zeelander 55 above, as well as our [just sold] Zeelander 44, and of course your yacht when you come to visit us (or perhaps trade it in because where there is a will, there is a way).

I’ll also take the liberty to add here that should you buy the our Z55, and would like to stay local, I can make you an attractive deal on this season’s dockage as well.

III. Your August Viewing Opportunities

August presents you with some exciting opportunities to experience all that Zeelander offers. We are now making appointments for two safe and private events. And a third one is in the works!

A) Your Sag Harbor event….

First, from August 7th though the 13th, you can see and sea trial the Z55 in that gem of the Hamptons, Sag Harbor:

Sag Harbor, at the foot of the docks.

You’ll find us at slip #10, opposite the mega yachts, so artfully shown here:

Zeelander 55, Slip 10, Sag Harbor Town Dock

We are providing sea trials from 10am through 6pm by prior appointment only. Please schedule yours now. Because, as you’ve heard me say (quite recently) You Snooze, You Lose.

B) Your Montauk Event…

From Sag Harbor we head to that other storied yachting capital – Montauk! From August 14th – 16th we will be at the Montauk Lake Club:

We will be the outer dock:

Again, this is by appointment only, so I recommend you jump quick and loud.

IV. And Now For Something Completely Different

https://youtu.be/Zk-kQSz-Qv0

Beyond the Z55 in its standard hardtop configuration, Zeelander now has information available on her “topless” sister. She’s called the Z55 Cabriolet-flair:

Zeelander 55 Cabriolet-flair
Zeelander 55 Cabriolet-flair

This new and striking 55′ design is named after the beautiful (and sometimes squirrelly) seaside road that runs from Saint Jean Cap Ferrat to Monaco. If you’ve driven in heavy fog from Nice to Monaco, you may know it too well.

I was in Sag Harbor this week and found it hard not to notice the tremendous growth in the (mostly Dutch) dayboat market of soft top yachts, right up to the twenty meter range. George Clooney seems to get the whole dayboat concept (certainly in comparison to his Andrea Gayle experiences):

Well, the Cabriolet-flair floats quite proudly in this part of the market.You can read more about her right HERE. As always, for pricing (without hardtop tooling, she comes in less than the regular Z55) and delivery information, just launch a flare.

V. And, of course, our Z72

With all this Z55 news, I don’t want us all to lose sight of our Zeelander 72. Here’s the furthest along 72 at this very moment:

This particular Z72 will wrap up in September. Our scheduled Z72 will splash a few months later, at the end of the year. But if a September delivery works for you, I may be able to do some magic. Because, again,

Where there’s a will, there’s a way!

Until next week, when George and I return Zeelander University to your good graces.

Thanks, and enjoy!

Big Wave Dave (and now a first time grandfather!)

Meet Hallie!

 

 

 

The Ghosts in the Machine

Welcome to Chapter #3 in Zeelander University’s Master Degree program – The latest course in your 12-part series in advanced Zeelander ownership.

Today we’re going to explore together one of yachting’s high water marks in innovation, one where Northern European builders and engineers jumped far ahead of the rest of the industry:

The ins, the outs (and the sideways) of IPS drives

Zeelander Yachts – starting with their Z44 model – was an eager, early and successful adopter of Volvo Penta’s IPS drive systems. Every Zeelander built to date features this technology. That includes our about-to-be shipped Zeelander 55, arriving at our CT docks in mid-June. She is powered by twin Volvo Penta IPS 1350HP engines:

Z55 #7 w/twin IPS 1350’s, arriving CT mid-June
Closeup of the IPS 1350

Zeelander’s positive owner experiences with these drives suggests we take a comprehensive “under-the-hood” view of exactly what this integration does for owners, and how. Trust me, by the time you finish this chapter you’ll know more about this technology than 99% of your dockmates.

If you are late to the Zeelander University party, or would like to dive in again, you’ll find Chapter #1 on Night Vision options right here,  and Chapter #2’s coverage of Yacht Tender Storage Solutions here

But first, a word about about our fleet. By mid-June I will have two Zeelander models available for your viewing at our Norwalk, CT docks – A 2013 Z44,

Z44 Sistership

and the brand new Z55:

Z55 Sistership

A Brief Note About Safe Viewings: I look forward to showing you the Z44 and Z55 in person. Towards that end, I’m keeping a close eye on CT’s social distancing guidelines.

Longtime readers know my dedication to (an obsession with?) safety on the water. It has earned me in some circles the nickname of Safety Dave. I can live with that. I’m gratified that The Fog Warning’s blog postings devoted to safety issues continue to be its most widely read and shared. In fact, the single most viewed posting of all time continues to be this cautionary tale

So please rest assured that I have your best interests at heart in exactly when and how to show you these fine vessels. I promise you a good and safe time will be had by all, both at the dock and at sea. 

Meanwhile, back in our brave new world of virtual realms, here is your own private “boat show in a can” – 360 degree virtual tours of the Zeelander 44, 55 and the flagship 72:

Z44, Z55, Z72 and a Heesen 164 last June at our private Newport event. Stay tuned for this summer’s event schedule.

I. It’s an IPS World

Volvo Penta’s IPS technology is now almost 15 years old. I remember when I first heard Volvo’s pitch at an advance industry conference. It all seemed just too good to be true:

  • Joystick operation (a Hinckley exclusive, up until then);
  • Reduced fuel consumption;
  • Higher speed with less noise;
  • Tighter turning radii; 
  • Fewer engine installation hours;
  • A completely flat power curve, from low RPM to high (sorry, jets).
  • Dynamic Positioning (exactly what was that, I wondered?); and
  • Smaller (!) engines????

I was unconvinced, at first. Now, with some 540 builders having installed over 24,000 units, it’s hard to remember why it seemed so controversial. But indeed it was. Especially for me.

At the time I was selling large, powerful Turkish motor yachts with straight shaft MAN inboards, usually 1550 hp models. As a sometimes stodgy traditionalist, I was a tough sell. In particular, Safety Dave had a hard time getting past this key question:

“What happens when you run aground at speed?”

If a pod ripped off, I couldn’t see how it wouldn’t leave an awfully big hole in the bottom of the boat.

Volvo wholly answered my concerns with this [now] classic “test to destruction” video:

https://youtu.be/nLmlWgLHZAc

Some 15 years later, as far as I can determine there has never been a case of catastrophic hull damage due to an IPS grounding. In what I suppose is becoming the theme of today’s post, You gotta love great engineering!

II. Some History

This wouldn’t be a Master’s Degree program without some history in it, would it? Well, the IPS story starts in Sweden in 1959 – A time when a small Northern European country was able to punch above its weight (warning: more boxing metaphors to follow) and command the world stage in sports. 

That’s when Ingemar Johannson, (he of the crushing right hand he affectionately called “Toonder and lightning,” but others called “The Hammer of Thor”)

shocked the boxing world by taking the heavyweight crown away from Floyd Patterson (with seven knockdowns in three rounds, at Yankee Stadium) as seen here.

And just a few months later, at the New York Boat Show (anyone remember the classic NY Coliseum shows, on Central Park?)

https://youtu.be/vetk4VGS344

Volvo Penta introduced the world’s first sterndrive engine, the Aquamatic:

Over the next three years Volvo Penta sold a then-unheard of $20m of these engines (in 1960 dollars!). They even hired their Swedish heavyweight champ to promote it, albeit on somewhat shaky waterskis:

https://youtu.be/JlAGJdMbpuw?t=185

Ingemar, in case you are wondering, promptly retired to buy and operate a Volvo-powered commercial fishing vessel in the North Sea.

As for Volvo, many revolutions (sic) later, in 2004 they landed their biggest knockout blow to date with launch of their IPS program.

Z55 #7
IPS Twin Drive Installation

III. The Ghosts in the Machine

If you happen to know exactly what “IPS” stands for, go ahead and blow The Fog Warning’s official horn (and your own):

IPS stands for “Integrated Propulsion System” – The artful (largely computer-driven) integration of a motor to a separate underbody drivetrain.  Its game changing features (beyond the joystick) included:

  • Forward facing counter-rotating props; 
  • Set into pods that pivots to port and starboard over a 30 degree range; 
  • 100% aligned with the bottom of the hull;
  • Eliminating the cost, drag, vulnerability and maintenance required of separate rudders, shafts and struts and gutless bearings;
  • Set into small and “slippier” hubs; allowing,
  • Larger prop blades.

They all magically come together to produce: 

  • 40% longer cruising range;
  • 20% higher top speed;
  • 30% reduced fuel consumption;
  • 30% less CO2 emissions;
  • 50% lower perceived noise; and,
  • All at lower horsepower!

For me that lower HP remains the icing on the cake. The IPS 1350’s equivalent horsepower (measured at the crankshaft) is actually produced by a 1000 HP engine. Why pay for more HP than you need? For comparison’s sake, in the straight-shaft world going from a 1000HP engine to a 1350 would cost you an additional 30%. 

Before we take a closer look at the magic under the hood, a brief aside about the notable efficiencies IPS drives provide by their “100% alignment with the bottom of the hull.” Here is a diagram of a traditional drivetrain, with its 12 degree downward shaft offset. It’s easy to see how much thrust is misdirected and wasted:

Now compare that with the completely flat IPS angle here, where every ounce of thrust is is directed towards forward movement:

Comparing these two diagrams I can see how Volvo’s engineers back in the day must have had the thought “There has to be a better way!”

There is. And here’s exactly how it works, via some high-value video – The best video I’ve ever seen of how IPS drives behave as you manipulate the wheel, throttles, and joystick (in split-screen view, no less). This video greatly increased my understand and appreciation of exactly what is going on under my feet as I move Zeeladander’s around.

You will note the full pod pivot, the operation of the counter-rotating props, and the varying exhaust trails as the skipper puts this [triple] IPS installation her through her paces:

https://youtu.be/ekRmPiPWYc0

The operation of double IPS installations (as in our Z55) is identical. The same is true for our Z72’s triple engine installation. Once boats get up into the 80+ range, quadruple IPS installs are common. But the basics never change.

Here are some things to look out for, minute by minute:

At Moment 0:53:

Here the boat is in idle, her props fully at rest. Notice the continuous exhaust bubbling out of the pod’s hub, rising up against the bottom of the hull. That’s a uniquely IPS experience. With traditional drives the exhausts exit at or through the boat’s transom. But with IPS drives at idle you’re always sitting on a bubbling cushion of air. On a flat calm day you will feel a little bit of vibration, and hear some gurgling.

Personally, this never bothers me. And the larger the boat, the less you’ll feel and hear (I see zero effect on the hull in this video’s 48′ test boat). But Zeelander owners typically have asked the builder to add Volvo’s Clearwake system for a quieter experience. It’s an exhaust bypass system that diverts the engine’s discharge out the transom in idle, just like in traditional straight drive installations. This option works automatically and seamlessly, and Zeelander’s owners report it a good investment. We have added it to June’s Z55 #7 delivery, so please feel free to call me for its pricing:

At Moment 1:21

Note how the pods pivot when the steering wheel is manually turned. Who needs the added complexity, cost and drag of rudders? In my experience, the high speed turning radius of IPS boats is a good 20% tighter than traditional shaft-driven boats, with less slide-slippage. It really does feel like the boat is turning on rails. 

At Moment 1:43

As the engines are put in gear, note how the props counter-rotate. And if you look carefully, once the props are moving the exhaust stream source changes from the center hub up to the base of the unit, right against the hull. This is a performance move, as it reduces air in the prop stream, and eliminates cavitation.  Less air, more performance!

At Moment 2:53

Here you get a great split-screen view of joystick operation. Now we see how much of the fly-by-wire coordination is computer-driven. Again, gotta love that great engineering.

At Moment 4:17

Here you see a few moments of my favorite IPS/Zeelander feature: Dynamic Positioning. That’s where the “ghosts in the machine” really take over. You can get a fuller appreciation of the technology here:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ks4lsblg29E

Personally, I never got the phrase “dynamic positioning.” What does this engineering gobbledygook even mean? The phrase pre-dates IPS, by the way, part of a failed commercial and military project that went nowhere at the time. It took awhile for the technology to catch up with the vision.

I prefer the term Virtual Anchor, because that’s how we really use it. Push the button and two GPS sensors and a digital compass all spring into action, keeping the boat “anchored” and at a fixed compass heading for as long as you want. At the Palm Beach Marina (with its sometimes 3 knot ICW currents) I’ve held a pod-driven yacht 18” away between two opposing finger docks (without fenders) for fifteen minutes at a time. And this feature really comes into its own when you are:

Jockeying for position, waiting for the bridge to open…
Putting out your fenders…
Waiting for the fuel dock slip to open…
Casting to breaking fish, in current…
Launching your tender (safely, on the down-wind side)…
And of course, setting up for your perfectly romantic sunset/sunrise view.

They’re all just a push-button push away.  Worry free. Well, almost….

There are two things I suggest you keep an eye on: First, while you may be virtually anchored in place as you await that bridge opening in substantial current, most of the other boats around you will not be. And they can and will swoop down on you! If its a crowded day with many bridges to cross, I’ll put out my fenders just in case. On a less crowded day I’ll set my radar alarm to its 1/16th of a mile setting. That’ll pick up your intruders.

Now, in a credit to both their engineering skills and the size of their R&D budget (more on this below), Volvo Penta made this scenario easier to manage with their latest development: Enhanced Dynamic Positioning. When virtually anchored, all you have to do is just tap the joystick once, and your boat will shift over 30’ in that direction – and then automatically re-anchor herself! When the offending intruder has passed by you, you can resume your prior position with just another touch. Here’s a cool demo:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=A9MfgZV1w9o&feature=share&app=desktop
Brilliant!

Secondly, you shouldn’t put swimmers in the water while you are virtually anchored. Once you hit that button, the props are going to spin under their own (utterly blind) command. So when swimmers (or divers) are out and about, change the virtual for the actual – Drop that small, beautiful stainless plaything that sits so nicely at the bow of your bigger beautiful plaything:

IV. The Future

As I said, I give Volvo credit for continually evolving and improving IPS technologies. In my view, traditional straight shaft designs in our industry have been essentially static for the last fifteen years. MAN and the other big-box builders moved over to environmentally friendlier “Common Rail” technologies then, but haven’t done much since. Hinckley made improvements to their harbor-speed steering about six years ago, but I’m not aware of too much else since then. But Volvo’s dedication of significant resources to their R&D budget continues to pay off for owners (for example, see Active Corrosion Protection, in the Maintenance section, below).

As for the future, IPS is destined for a major enhancement in a year or so: An entirely self-docking boat! By connecting onboard sensors with dock-mounted beacons, docking will be managed by the ultimate “ghost in the machine”. An early version works well. In a demo test in Europe an industry observer wrote:

Even as an RYA instructor/examiner with years of experience berthing all kinds of boats, including craft fitted with IPS and a joystick, I wouldn’t have been able to maintain such slow, steady progress into the berth whilst keeping the boat perfectly on track.

I suspect that the actual release of this technology awaits a chicken-or-egg business challenge – until marina’s adopt and install the required beacons, owner’s won’t pay for the option (no pricing is hinted at yet). But I am certain that once its released – and Zeelander’s own engineers have put it through their own rigorous tests – it will become available to you. Until then, here’s your preliminary look:

https://youtu.be/NAN_rQM3rr8

Beyond that, Volvo has a working model of a hybrid electric IPS drive. Based upon what I saw at the Dusseldorf boat show this winter, hybrid drives are growing in popularity far quicker in Europe than here. But once worldwide demand for this technology increases, I’m sure you’ll see Volvo introduce it into the market

V. Maintenance

The maintenance needs of traditional inboards are different than pods. Inboards require:

  • Sacrificial-anode replacement;
  • Prop adjustment;
  • Cutless bearing repair;
  • Shaft alignment;
  • Anti-fouling paint;
  • Engine oil checks;
  • Transmission fluid checks; and,
  • Fluid checks of hydraulic steering.

Pods delete from your concern prop adjustments, cutless bearing repairs, and shaft alignments. But they do add to the mix:

  • Drive-oil changes every 250 hours, or annually;
  • Lower-unit oil checks.
  • Annual removal and inspection of prop sets and seals;
  • Re-greasing of the prop shafts; and,
  • Lower unit antifouling paint.

As for your zinc replacements, you can take that off your to-do list (and off your annual budget) by opting for Volvo’s Volvo Penta’s new ACP (Active Corrosion Protection) system. It replaces conventional anodes altogether by applying carefully measured countering currents, continually measuring and automatically adjusting the electrical output for protection in both brackish and salt water. What’s more (and I just love this) it displays your degree of protection in real time on your engine control panel:

Volvo’s Active Corrosion Protection System Screen Readout

If you keep your boat in a “hot” marina (just check your yard bill for how often they have to replace your anodes) this is for you. It’ll save on hauls and divers, big time. As always, for options pricing, just launch that flare…

Speaking of your budget, on an annual basis pod maintenance (done right, by our certified IPS techs) is going to cost a little more than straight drives – perhaps $1,000 more per engine (on the other hand is should cost about $2,000 less than jet drive maintenance). But net/net, the increase in IPS fuel efficiency over straight drives will leave you ahead if you use your boat more than 150 hours a year.

VI. Warranty

As for Volvo’ warrantee, IPS systems come standard with two year’s of warrantee coverage. But on your price lists you will find the option of increasing that term by three years, for a total of five year’s protection.

Now, there are way too many variables for me to predict your service needs in years three to five. But I will disclose here an industry secret: Volvo incentivizes its techs, worldwide, to respond to extended warrantee owners first. As I see it, if you need critical service over the July 4th weekend, its nice to be at the top of the list.

VII. Class Takeaways

A client recently engaged me in a long talk about The Fog Warning’s mission statement. As quoted on its homepage, it’s all about answering those big, eternal questions of yachting:

1. What makes a yacht great, and why?

2. Who makes a great yacht, and how?

My client, a skilled yachtsman and a bit of philosopher, suggested that the “who” is a more subjective question than the “what.” He has a good point. I’ll talk about the “what” first.

Locked away and thinking hard in the Hamptons (however comfortably) these last three months, it’s become clearer to me than ever that what makes a yacht great, in measurable and objective ways, is great engineering.

I have long looked to Norther European builders for this kind of innovation and quality. Now, of course great engineering does not live exclusively in this part of the world. But when I look at what Volvo has done on the propulsion side; what Feadship, Lurssen and Heesen have done for big yachts; and what Zeelander delivers for “small” yachts, I see theIr uncompromising devotion to quality engineering as their defining character. Personally, I’m excited to be associated with that kind of character.

As for the second, more subjective question – Who makes a great yacht? Well, that’s more your call than mine. Put another way, that’s for your needs, values, and tastes to determine. The Fog Warning has averaged 6,800 annual readers over the last few years. That’s thousands of different opinions of what’s best, and every one is more important than mine. All I will say on the matter is this:

Knowledge is power!

See you at the next class (if not on a CT Zeelander before then).

Safety Dave

Four screens + one bottomless cup of coffee + 25 hours of work = Z.U. #3

 

Love Me Tender

Welcome back for chapter two of your continuing twelve-part series in advanced Zeelander ownership. In the end you’ll be awarded your well-deserved Masters in Zeelander Yachts degree.

This week we try to answer that age-old question of yachting, reportedly first asked by H.M.S. Bounty’s Captain Bligh himself:

Where is the best place to store my tender?

The industry presents lots of options. What solution best meets your needs?

This discussion is somewhat technical (it includes a rating system of all choices), but then again this is an advanced degree!

I’ll begin with an admission of …. hard headedness. Over the years some long-time clients and readers of The Fog Warning have called me to task for my famously inflexible opinion about the best way to store yacht tenders:

“Trust me, all of your storage options are bad. Pick the least bad one.”

I’ll explain today how I came to that opinion. And why I’ve recently changed my mind.

The choices are fairly narrow. We all know that yacht tenders are stored Up, Back, Way Back, or Down. Having launched, retrieved, and transported a wide variety of tenders in my time, I get to make the rules. So I’m evaluating your choices under the following criteria:

  1. Space Utilization
  2. The “Disruption Factor”
  3. Aesthetics
  4. Safety
  5. Ease of use (and speed)

I rate on a scale of 1-10 (with an understanding that except for our children, there are no 10’s in either boats or life). I know from experience that my clients aren’t shy about expressing their opinions, so I look forward to hearing your own ratings. Just launch those flares!

I. THE UP

Mahogany Rose – Vicem 67 FB – $1,050,000

Flybridge yachts, like Mahogany Rose, above, offer tons of acreage up top for hydraulic cranes and tenders. Cranes can be sized to lift quite sizable tenders (not to mention cars, motorcycles, jet skis, and submarines). I’ve found that with some practice you can launch or retrieve even a fairly large tender in under fifteen minutes (in sheltered waters).

It’s a well-tested choice. With a yacht over 100,000 pounds, the added weight up high doesn’t affect your pitch and roll much, and if you’re fortunate to have stabilizers, not at all. Crane hydraulics are a tried and true technology, and if you check routinely for hydraulic leaks (and have a couple of quarts of backup fluid stashed in your bilges) you’re good to go.

In a fun aside, check out an earlier Fog Warning post about a creative (and healthy) emergency hydraulic fluid back up, under the Way Back section later in this post.

Here’s my own scoring on the matter:

  • Efficient use of valuable space: With all that space up top, why not throw a tender up there? All in all, you can store larger tenders up top than any other solutions. And for bigger yachts, + 30 meters, you can even have both a crane/tender and a jacuzzi. My rating? 9/10.
  • The “Disruptive Factor”: How disruptive is launching and retrieving a tender to your partying guests? Not very. It all happens largely without impacting anyone in the cockpit, or down below. But the process is a bit of a circus (like docking your boat in high winds, it tends to attract lots of gawking), and it invites lots of comments from your distracted guests. But when the time comes to line your tender back to your cockpit or swim platform boarding areas, things go more smoothly when your guests aren’t wandering about. My rating? 8/10.
  • Aesthetics: Some find the look a little clunky, others find it wonderfully “shippy.” It’s a highly personal thing, and I’m not going to piss anyone off with my rating. But please let me know yours. No rating.
  • Safety: There is no way around this – You’re swinging a 1,500 pound load twenty feet up in the air, often amidst wind or waves. It’s a one-man or woman operation in only the calmest of conditions. Otherwise, while you’re manning the crane remote, at least one other person (up top, down below, or both) must use tender lines and boat hooks to keep the tender aligned fore and aft with the mother ship. What’s more, as with all of your tender storage choices (except one, discussed below in THE DOWN) its easier and safer if you drop your anchor first. But I add points for this: I don’t know of a better shorthanded solution than a crane for a man overboard recovery. My rating? 5/10.
  • Ease of use: Like I said, its a bit of a circus, with lots of moving parts. And, depending upon the reach of your crane, there will be situations where dockside use is impossible without turning the mother ship around 180 degrees. My rating? 4/10.

Big Wave Dave’s weighted average? 27/40, or 68%.

Note: Mahogany Rose, the Vicem 67 listing above, is in Charleston, and very much for sale (just launch a flare). In addition to the crane and tender up top, she also features a fully pivoting radar mast. It’ll allow you to get you under that 19′ 3″ bridge in Chicago, halfway through your life-changing Great Loop cruise.

Also, one of my older listings, a recently sold Viking 82, took a different approach to tender storage by putting the crane and tender up on the front deck. I’m curious how you’d score that one.

II. THE BACK

By “back” I means under the cockpit. From a design standpoint, doing that well can be very tricky. Designers have to give a lot of thought to the tradeoffs involved, because as that great deadpan comedian Steven Wright once said:

There are two ways to approach this challenge – a lifting cockpit (like the Palm Beach boats) or by means of a transom slide (most everyone else). In both approaches it takes larger boats – with both ample beam and freeboard – to pull it off well:

Azimut 77 – Rear Slide design

Case in point, narrower designs sometimes require partially deflating the tender to squeeze it in:

Pershing 70 – Rear slide design

And some designs don’t optimize their freeboard considerations, and these can take some muscle (and gymnastics) to operate:

And, of course, the more you squeeze under your cockpit, the more you’ll limit your valuable space in the cockpit. This inevitably reduces your cherished seating and storage capabilities, as you’ll see here:

Palm Beach 55 – Lifting cockpit design
Palm Beach 55 – Lifting Cockpit Design

So, paraphrasing comedian Steven Wright, how am I gonna score it?

  • Efficient use of valuable space: The above pix make pretty clear that the space tradeoffs – particularly as to cockpit seating and storage – can be significant. And for me, cockpit seating is a critical part of guests’ enjoyment. My Rating: 5/10.
  • The “Disruptive Factor”: In a lifting cockpit design everyone has to bail out from the cockpit. My ratings? 1/10. And 8/10 for the rear slide (see smaller cockpit space, above).
  • Aesthetics: It’s all about how well the designers can keep the freeboard profile reasonable. My rating? 9/10 if they can do it well. But if it looks like they’re hiding something big in the oven, a 6/10.
  • Safety: No safety impacts that I can see. My rating? 9/10.
  • Ease of use: Lifting cockpit – Not only do you have to clear the cockpit of guests, but you also have a fairly long walk aft to the end of the swim platform. I timed this last fall at eight minutes to launch or retrieve. My rating? 4/10. Rear slide: 8/10 (and six minute’s work).

Big Wave Dave’s weighted average?

29/50 (58%) for the lifting cockpit.

39/50 (78%) for the rear slide.

III. THE WAY BACK

What we all see every day, in every harbor: Swim platform mounts like Freedom Lifts:

Freedom lift (empty)
Freedom Lift (full)

Or, hydraulically lifting swim platforms:

In my experience, both technologies work fine. Builders love them because they require little or no design modifications at the factory. And there is a healthy after-market business culture to sell and support them.

My reservations, such as they are, are not deal-killers. I don’t love the corrosion risks of Freedom Lift’s aluminum components. But I do appreciate the sliver of useable platform space it allows between the transom and the edge of the tender.

And the hydraulic platforms? Well…

  • Obviously, it’s a two step dance – You’ve got to first launch the tender before your guests can swim from the platform, or use it as their private “beach.”
  • Backing into a slip you have to remember that you’ve got twelve or eighteen inches of tender sticking out beyond the swim platform edge. That’s going to hit the dock before your boat does. The costs of forgetting are high (Don’t ask…. just please don’t ask).
  • While the pictures and videos rarely show it, best practices require that the tender be tightly tied down to the chocks or mounts, and that the platform be tightly strapped to the transom. This takes more time than you might expect, and often take some gymnastics to get it all right.

Here’s how I score it:

  • Efficient use of valuable space: You can store your tender aft, or you can have a platform for boarding or swimming. You can’t do both well unless the yacht is particularly big, or the tender particularly small (see Steven Wright, above). My Rating? 6/10
  • The “Disruptive Factor”: Points added for having an unencumbered cockpit space. Points lost for “you can’t do both well,”above. My Rating? 7/10.
  • Aesthetics: Well, the degree of gracefulness depends upon whether you are at rest, or underway. At cruising speed, that additional four or five degrees of bow rise really adds to an awkward look when you’re balancing a tender way aft. My Rating? 4/10 at rest, 2/10 underway. I average it out here to a 3/10.
  • Safety: Having a functional lifting platform available at all times is a great man overboard recovery tactic. But of course you’re unlikely to have the time to launch the tender first when you hear that big splash and yell. Plus, see backing in, above. My Rating? 4/10.
  • Ease of use: But for strapping things in and down, they are easy-to -use solutions. But doing it right can easily take six or seven minutes. My Rating? 7/10.

Big Wave Dave’s weighted average? 28/50 (55%).

NOTE: That creative emergency hydraulic lift repair I mentioned earlier?

You can read all about it in this post here.

IV. THE DOWN

As I’m mentioned up front, my conclusions about tender use and storage have evolved over the years. With a bunch of Zeelander operating hours now under my belt, I’ve seen that putting the tender below deck in a central garage is a game-changer. After all, megayachts have been doing this for years, and they be no fools:

My own conversion began with this: A “real time” retrieval video that clocks in – beginning to end – at just 1 minute and 50 seconds:

https://youtu.be/lpqkNOwzDdQ

Here’s how Zeelander pulls that off:

The garage is standard equipment for both the Zeelander 55 and the 72, and the tenders are chosen off their option lists.

Sans le youyou (as the French say), the garage of our next available Zeelander 55 – shipping to the USA next month – looks like this:

You’ll get a better sense of its location from these Z55 and Z72 plans. Note that the weight of the tender is exactly where designers want it for optimal handling – Low and central!

Zeelander 55 Plan
Zeelander 72 Plan

With all tender storage solutions, you’ll know its done right when the yacht’s trim doesn’t change, with and without the tender. I use the “marble test” to check (does a marble roll about differently on the flat cockpit deck, before launch and after?)

In my experience, Zeelander’s do not lose their marbles.

When I say that designers look for “optimal handling” in their weight calculations, for both the Z55 and the Z72 their turn-on-a-dime ability is fully verifiable by video, as seen below:

https://youtu.be/JfNChyl3HNU
https://youtu.be/o9JBmm_O9Rc

As for tender choices, both garages are custom-sized for either a Williams 280 or a Williams 285 Minijet tender.

The Williams 280 is 9-foot 2-inch long, and weights 440 pounds. Its 45 horsepower waterjet engine gives her a top speed of 31 knots:

https://youtu.be/Z1HWEV1OokI

The Williams 285 is 9′ 6″ long, and weighs 695 pounds. It’s 85 HP engine pushes her to 37 knots.

But, for speed demons everywhere, an optional 100 HP engine delivers 42 knots! Notably (for all you drag racers) that is the top speed of both the Z55 and the Z72 models with their largest engine packages (of course, the packages we chose for our coming Z55 and Z72 stock yachts).

https://youtu.be/EFcQpbZG0Gc

If you and your’s require a bigger tender, Zeelander has a plan for that (where there is a will, there is a way!) If you go back and review the Z72 plans above, you’ll notice that just behind the garage is the crew cabin. If you opt out of that cabin, you can extend the garage to handle a full 5-person tender, the 12′ 8″ Williams 395:

https://youtu.be/pB7mAOq0KSM

To the extent that a tender is a water toy (albeit a large one), I’ll note that the garage has dedicated storage space for other water toys. Just about the most popular item off Zeelander’s option list are SeaBob’s. Most of the Zeelander’s delivered to date have one or two tucked into their garages, with additional charging stations installed by the swim platform):

https://youtu.be/SX2vkWa8XbQ

If you want to push your water toy enjoyment to the max, the Zeelander 72 is large enough to store and present your own private (and moveable) “inflatable beach resort,” as shown here for soon-to-splash Z72 Hull #2:

Your go-anywhere private beach resort

All that’s missing in this private beach resort pic is Zeelander’s “safari” approach to celebrating sunrises and sets:

As always, for the full details about yacht base pricing and all of these options, just break out your flare gun.

Enough! My conclusions? By the criteria I’ve been using above, I have yet to find any significant disadvantages to this “Down” design. Here’s how I score it:

  • Efficient use of valuable space: This is perhaps the most valuable yield I’ve seen from IPS engine placement. Moving the engine systems aft provide all the space a garage requires, without impacting either the size of the engine room or the size of the master or VIP cabins. My rating? 9/10.
  • The “Disruption Factor”: On both models, access to the garage from deck level is by means of a hatch, away from exterior seating. Your guests and their margaritas can stay put. There is, however, some disruption on the Z55, as the hatch is just aft of the salon entry door. That will block traffic, intermittently. My Rating? 8/10.
  • Aesthetics: There is simply nothing to see when the garage is closed. My rating? 9/10.
  • Safety: I see no compromises to safety anywhere. Actually, quite the contrary. I’m sold on the garage’s central location for bad weather launches and retrievals. I’ll start with three examples: 1) With Zeelander’s optional gyroscopic stabilizer (look for that discussion in upcoming Zeelander University Chapter 5) and dynamic positioning systems (Chapter 9) you can always “anchor” the mothership so that you can launch and retrieve your tender on the down-wind and down-tide side, regardless of conditions. 2) With your key-fob remote control in your pocket, you can single-hand yourself in and out of the garage in any weather. 3) What’s more, you’re never stepping down into a pitching tender from a rolling deck – You start and end your journey already seated. I can’t say enough about these safety advantages, and I very much look forward to demonstrating them for you. My rating? 9/10 (only because I don’t do 10’s).
  • Ease of use: Quick and easy, as our viral 1:50 video shows. Minor impacts include: 1) You can only dock starboard to (for the Z55), or portside to (for the Z72) to launch and retrieve. 2) When docked stern to, you’ll need 9′ of room between your yacht and the one aside you in order to launch. My rating? 8/10.

Big Wave Dave’s weighted average? 43/50 (86%)

I hope you’ve enjoyed this [too geeky?] chapter. If it gave you some things to contemplate during some idle moments, I’ll feel I’ve done my job (in a socially distanced way).

For me, this learning experience has been a reminder that happiness in life usually flows from flexibility. I began this chapter with my long-held opinion that all of your tender storage choices are bad. But new approaches and new designs have opened my eyes. I look forward to your thoughts on the matter.

V. Signing off

I’m going to close today with some recent pix and video’s of our next available Z55, Hull #7. She is just finishing the last of her last interior work in Rotterdam, and she will ship to us in thirty days. As you’ll see below, just about all she needs is her next owner. If that spirit moves you, we should talk fairly quickly. After all, why ship this fine yacht someplace other than your dock? Beats me!

https://vimeo.com/410643739

We will pick this up again soon. Meanwhile, stay safe.

Big Wave Dave

P.S. A small gift for you – This punk version here of Elvis’ classic Love Me Tender. If you’ve rocked out like this lately, I want to hear all about it.

https://youtu.be/OiSHaFawYDU

The Survey from Hell

I’ll get it to it, I’ll get to it. But first, a word from our sponsor…

We are eight weeks out from the delivery of our (or even better, your) Zeelander 55! It takes about ten months to build a Z55, depending upon the level of customization. But with yachts this size just about everything comes to life in in her last 60 days. To quote Hemingway (on an entirely different subject), completing a yacht happens…

“…two ways. Gradually, then suddenly.”

Well, as you’ll see here, we’re knee deep in the suddenly right now:

If you would like to accompany us for her first early Spring sea trials in Rotterdam, please let me know right away. I’ll do my best to smuggle you aboard. Otherwise, I’d be thrilled to take you on a sea trial in Connecticut in the late Spring.

But if you cannot wait that long too see the finished product, we will be displaying a sister ship at the Palm Beach Boat Show from March 26th through the 29th. You can cruise through her virtual tour (I just love the unhurried views this technology provides) right here.

We will also be presenting in Palm Beach our Zeelander 72….

…. and that particular 360 degree tour awaits your arrival here.

And, finally, we are presenting one (maybe two) Zeelander 44’s at the show, almost identical to what you can tour here.

The specific listings for these boats three fine yachts…..

are just three little clicks away:

https://www.yachtworld.com/boats/2020/zeelander-72-3640530/

https://www.yachtworld.com/boats/2020/zeelander-55h-3640027/

https://www.yachtworld.com/boats/2012/zeelander-44h-3483654/

 

Ok, loyal clients, I commend you for your patience. Here now, the story of a survey from hell. And I apologize in advance for being a bit flippant about a very serious story.

The USS Fitzgerald, after narrowly escaped sinking.

This photo is of the USS Fitzgerald, a destroyer that in the summer of 2017 collided in the Sea of Japan with a tanker ten times its size. Seven sailors lost their lives is this tragedy, and only the selfless bravery of a number of seamen prevented many more deaths. Indeed, they kept the ship afloat until all could be rescued.

Collisions at sea are something I try to keep tabs on, having been involved in one myself. So I read the initial reports that summer, and wondered how two massive vessels – in this age of modern electronics – can collide at 20 knots in clear weather, in relatively sheltered waters.

Direct impact to the Captain’s cabin.

A few months ago I read an upsetting account of exactly how it happened. It is a very sobering read. In short, it was a combination of:

  • Extremely short-staffed boats, some 15% under headcount;
  • An over-taxed and over-scheduled Pacific Fleet, on an almost wartime footing with Korea;
  • Thoroughly exhausted and under-trained crews.

But what really jumped out at me was the horrendous level of deferred maintenance of the Fitzgerald. The Navy’s investigation of this accident was largely what we would recognize as a ship’s survey. And it truly was, in my mind, a survey from hell. It listed things that we (so fortunate that our missions are just recreational) would never tolerate on our own boats.

The Freighter

Simply put, the systems that we take for granted in our modern yachting life were broken. Some were inoperable for months before the collision. Crew and officers repeatedly complained to HQ that the vessel was at risk of a collision, but they were ignored. These include the radar systems (one was completely non-functional, and the back up radar’s tracking function required a crewman to manually punch a reset button 100 times per minute to track other vessels. AIS systems, VHF radios, chart plotters (crew used laptops as backups), vessel intercom systems, and even critical emergency pumps were inoperable.

This story will make you sad, and angry. But there are real heroes here, and you will be moved by their courage. You can read the full story here:

https://features.propublica.org/navy-accidents/us-navy-crashes-japan-cause-mccain/

Or you can do what I did, and listen to its riveting podcast on Audm.

I do believe there are lessons for us all here. When you have absorbed it all (the podcast is over an hour, and worth every minute of your time), please feel free to share your thoughts with me, online or off, and I will cover them in future posts of The Fog Warning.

Casting off now, loyal readers. Launch a flare if you need anything.

[Big Wave] Dave

You Heard It Here First!

 

Greetings, loyal clients and readers! Some very exciting things have happened in your yachting world recently (on both sides of the Atlantic) and I’d like to take a moment and dive into what this can mean for you. 

I am thrilled to announce that I have formed a new enterprise – Zeelander Yachts of North America. With a top team of interdisciplinary talents, we are this storied builder’s first exclusive importer/dealer in the Americas. 

If you are curious about the team, here’s the Press Release.

Zeelander has recognized that the best way to stay in tune with the unique yachting needs of the American market – and to take the best possible care of our clients and owners – is to establish this US network expressly for you. I can promise you that a good time will be had by all.

One thing The Fog Warning has taught me is how important it is to fully understand the yachting lifestyles of my skilled and knowledgeable readers. I pledge to put this understanding to good use here at Zeelander of North America. Our single-minded goal is to use this knowledge to assure your quality time on the water. As you might expect, of course I feel the best way to achieve that is by placing a fine Zeelander yacht at your dock! 

To that end, we have opened an office in Fort Lauderdale (with 175 feet of dock space). Service and support centers up and down the East Coast are soon to follow.

So, a little more about this whole Zeelander thing….

Happy owners have long been (and will always be) central to Zeelander’s success. The best expression of this that I’ve found is this “spectacular” (the owner’s word, not mine) video evaluation of his family’s Zeelander experience:

A “Spectacular” Experience

If you would like to enter this same spectacular world with me, I have four unique opportunities to discuss with you today:

First, a triple-engine, 43 knot 2020 Zeelander 72 is available for delivery to your dock at the end of this year:

You’ll find the full Yachtworld listing here:

Zeelander 72 #4 – December 2020 Delivery

Second, A twin-engine 2020 Zeelander 55 with a new and stylish interior comes to us (and to you) this April:

Zeelander 55 #7 – April Delivery

And finally, a couple of trades! I present you first with a 2012 factory re-furbished Zeelander 44She comes to you newly repainted, and with a 12 month warrantee. She awaits your viewing today at our docks in Fort Lauderdale:

2012 Factory Refurbished Z44 – $790,000

And, for those of you up north this winter, I also have a 2013 Zeelander 44, currently stored in a heated, indoor facility in Norwalk CT. She comes with a six month warrantee:

2013 Zeelander 44 – $725,000

Of course, custom builds are also on our menu at all times. 

Questions? You know the drill: Just launch a flare!

And, of course, I look forward to your visit at the Palm Beach Boat Show from March 26th through the 29.th Please let me know if I can set aside tickets for you and yours. 

Until then, as always, thanks for sharing these adventures with me. Going forward, from time to time these updates will be coming from a new Zeelander website, so keep an eye on your inbox.

Enjoy!

[Big Wave] Dave Mallach

Lauderdale Offerings

The Fort Lauderdale Boat Show countdown clock is now at T-9 days! Running from October 30th through November 3rd, I look forward to seeing you there aboard a wonderful three-boat display from Zeelander Yachts:

The Zeelander 44, 55 and 72

You will find us on the Hall of Fame side of the show, under the Northrop & Johnson banner, slips 41A, 42A and 43A.

Just south of the Los Olas Bridge

Here is our lineup:

I. Our Zeelander 72 was the Queen of the Show at the Newport and Norwalk Boat Shows. I know she will conquer Lauderdale as well!

You can find a revealing video review of her right here:

https://youtu.be/JfNChyl3HNU

And don’t hesitate to check out her Yachting Magazine review as well.

II. Right next to her you will find our Zeelander 55:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0n0FbzLJm5A

And while I’m not promising anything, I hope we can reprise our famous “swim platform tango” at the show:

https://youtu.be/EBJn7Gql2jM

III. And finally, recent winner of Motorboat Magazine 2019 Boat of the Year Award in her class, our Zeelander 44:

https://www.mby.com/motor-boat-awards/winners-2019-motor-boat-awards-revealed-105208/2

For those of you intrigued by all the exciting things happening in the global dayboat market, I’m pleased to offer you another opportunity to enjoy the best of Dutch yachting at the show. My friends at Wajer Yachts have contributed two of their fine yachts as water taxis at the show.

You can take a ride aboard their brand new Wajer 55S Jetboat:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IRypaEyXaOM

Or, the Water 38, which has captured a significant (and growing) part of the Mediterranean dayboat market:

https://youtu.be/anXRipq-_fM

Just launch a flare if you’d like further details on any of the above. For Zeelander’s in particular, I have just updated delivery and availability info. There are opportunities out there for you, but this is definitely one of my patented “you snooze, you lose” situations.

Thanks, and enjoy!

Big Wave Dave

From Newport to Cannes, to … Newport?

I. Summer in Newport

I am so pleased to report that our Zeelander Yachts “pop-up” boat show last month in Newport Harbor was a wonder and a joy – an [almost] living, breathing example of the “If it ain’t Dutch, it ain’t much” dynamic.

We had a brand new Zeelander 72 available for sea trials all weekend. Here she is, directly in front of a brand new Dutch “Mystery Ship,” and behind her smaller siblings, the Zeelander 55 and Z44. All in all (except for some pea-soup fog) it was a fabulously successful event.

I venture to say you are going to see a lot more of these pop-up, invitation-only events from more high-end boat builders. Builders are taking increasingly closer looks at their “bang for the buck” returns from traditional “big-box” boat shows.

As attendees, you’ve seen it all first-hand. Shows have gotten so big (think Miami, or Fort Lauderdale), that builders are finding it increasingly hard to make their quality products stand out in the marketplace. And even more importantly, among the crowds they struggle to provide you with the quality viewing and buying experience you deserve. So you can expect to see far more private, invitation-only showings like ours. In fact, this year and next you may be surprised about which high-end builders choose to skip the big box shows altogether. A brave new world….

I mentioned above that our pop-up was a “fabulous success.” Well, here is how I measure success:

We sold hull #2 of the new Zeelander 72!

I am pleased to say that she will be berthed in Connecticut next season. And that in anticipation of your order, Zeelander will be starting construction on hull #3 as you read this!

You can view an informative video review of this amazing yacht right here:

https://youtu.be/JfNChyl3HNU

And if you’d like to really poke around her, here’s a fun virtual tour:

The Virtual Tour

So, that brand new Dutch mystery yacht, immediately aft of our Zeelander line in Newport? She be Scout, a Hakvoort 64 meter explorer-class yacht:

I last saw her in the Haakvoort yard a couple of years ago, where she had been sort of …. abandoned? Her Russian owner-to-be had defaulted mid-build, so she sat for a while until her current Palm Beach owner could finish the project to his highly-customized liking:

https://youtu.be/edIIraSLFt4

It was a thrill to see Scout’s before and after, and I give great kudos to Hakvoort for riding the someway bumpy Scout project out right to her final home port. The Hakvoort yard, by the way, is in North Holland, not far from my friends at Wajer Yachts (it’s pronounced “Wire“).

I stopped in to see that factory a few weeks ago, as I wanted to get a better handle on the Wajer build process. Unlike most builders I know, they choose not to use subcontractors. Management explained to me that they are willing to take on higher labor costs, as they feel quality is better guaranteed by in-house staff! I was very impressed, particularly by their Wajer 55:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PZGYiRjpBsc

Last year at the HISWA show in Lelystad, Holland I saw the W55’s oh-so-innovative fender system. I expect that this will certainly get your attention:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ivn6AQpT9Ec

The Wajer Yachts motto is “Without a worry in the world.” I can’t think of a better representation of the entire Dutch approach to building quality yachts.

II. Fall in Cannes

I’ll be in Cannes on September 10th for the show’s opening, and I hope you will meet me there. What draws me there, however briefly, is to see and show two steel yachts that loyal readers of The Fog Warning have been following with me for some time: The Hartman Yachts Livingston 24, and the AvA Yachts Kando 110.

The Livingston 24 has just this week made its way from Holland to the south of France:

Hartman Yachts Livingston 24 entering Nice Harbor
Anchored at Cap Ferrat

I would delight in showing you this amazing yacht at Cannes. Just launch a flare for an appointment. Until then, the full listing can be seen here:

The Livingston 24 Yachtworld Listing

Later that day I will be aboard a yacht I have been following from the time her deck was first layed in Antalya, Turkey – The Kando 110:

Aluminum Deck to Steel Hull!

This will the first time I’ll see her afloat. Why not share this Cannes adventure with me? Just launch that flare…

III. Back to Newport!

From Day One of Cannes, I race back to Newport for Day One of the Newport Boat Show, which runs from September 12th through the 15th. The lineup there? Exactly what you saw (or missed!) at our July pop-up event: The Zeelander 72, 55, and 44:

To jump from one Zeelander to another, in size order, is a fabulous experience. Regular attendees at the Newport Show know how crazy the crowds can get. So please call me for a private viewing of these three spectacular yachts early or late on show days.

So, as usual, loyal readers, I’ve spanned the globe to bring you the finest yachts to be found anywhere. And for one of those yachts, I’ll leave you now with my final “mood piece,” one that I hope sets a tone for our next get-together in Cannes or Newport:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0n0FbzLJm5A

Thanks, and enjoy!

“Big Wave” Dave

April 13th, for all you father’s-of-the-brides!