You Heard It Here First!

 

Greetings, loyal clients and readers! Some very exciting things have happened in your yachting world recently (on both sides of the Atlantic) and I’d like to take a moment and dive into what this can mean for you. 

I am thrilled to announce that I have formed a new enterprise – Zeelander Yachts of North America. With a top team of interdisciplinary talents, we are this storied builder’s first exclusive importer/dealer in the Americas. 

If you are curious about the team, here’s the Press Release.

Zeelander has recognized that the best way to stay in tune with the unique yachting needs of the American market – and to take the best possible care of our clients and owners – is to establish this US network expressly for you. I can promise you that a good time will be had by all.

One thing The Fog Warning has taught me is how important it is to fully understand the yachting lifestyles of my skilled and knowledgeable readers. I pledge to put this understanding to good use here at Zeelander of North America. Our single-minded goal is to use this knowledge to assure your quality time on the water. As you might expect, of course I feel the best way to achieve that is by placing a fine Zeelander yacht at your dock! 

To that end, we have opened an office in Fort Lauderdale (with 175 feet of dock space). Service and support centers up and down the East Coast are soon to follow.

So, a little more about this whole Zeelander thing….

Happy owners have long been (and will always be) central to Zeelander’s success. The best expression of this that I’ve found is this “spectacular” (the owner’s word, not mine) video evaluation of his family’s Zeelander experience:

A “Spectacular” Experience

If you would like to enter this same spectacular world with me, I have four unique opportunities to discuss with you today:

First, a triple-engine, 43 knot 2020 Zeelander 72 is available for delivery to your dock at the end of this year:

You’ll find the full Yachtworld listing here:

Zeelander 72 #4 – December 2020 Delivery

Second, A twin-engine 2020 Zeelander 55 with a new and stylish interior comes to us (and to you) this April:

Zeelander 55 #7 – April Delivery

And finally, a couple of trades! I present you first with a 2012 factory re-furbished Zeelander 44She comes to you newly repainted, and with a 12 month warrantee. She awaits your viewing today at our docks in Fort Lauderdale:

2012 Factory Refurbished Z44 – $790,000

And, for those of you up north this winter, I also have a 2013 Zeelander 44, currently stored in a heated, indoor facility in Norwalk CT. She comes with a six month warrantee:

2013 Zeelander 44 – $725,000

Of course, custom builds are also on our menu at all times. 

Questions? You know the drill: Just launch a flare!

And, of course, I look forward to your visit at the Palm Beach Boat Show from March 26th through the 29.th Please let me know if I can set aside tickets for you and yours. 

Until then, as always, thanks for sharing these adventures with me. Going forward, from time to time these updates will be coming from a new Zeelander website, so keep an eye on your inbox.

Enjoy!

[Big Wave] Dave Mallach

Lauderdale Offerings

The Fort Lauderdale Boat Show countdown clock is now at T-9 days! Running from October 30th through November 3rd, I look forward to seeing you there aboard a wonderful three-boat display from Zeelander Yachts:

The Zeelander 44, 55 and 72

You will find us on the Hall of Fame side of the show, under the Northrop & Johnson banner, slips 41A, 42A and 43A.

Just south of the Los Olas Bridge

Here is our lineup:

I. Our Zeelander 72 was the Queen of the Show at the Newport and Norwalk Boat Shows. I know she will conquer Lauderdale as well!

You can find a revealing video review of her right here:

https://youtu.be/JfNChyl3HNU

And don’t hesitate to check out her Yachting Magazine review as well.

II. Right next to her you will find our Zeelander 55:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0n0FbzLJm5A

And while I’m not promising anything, I hope we can reprise our famous “swim platform tango” at the show:

https://youtu.be/EBJn7Gql2jM

III. And finally, recent winner of Motorboat Magazine 2019 Boat of the Year Award in her class, our Zeelander 44:

https://www.mby.com/motor-boat-awards/winners-2019-motor-boat-awards-revealed-105208/2

For those of you intrigued by all the exciting things happening in the global dayboat market, I’m pleased to offer you another opportunity to enjoy the best of Dutch yachting at the show. My friends at Wajer Yachts have contributed two of their fine yachts as water taxis at the show.

You can take a ride aboard their brand new Wajer 55S Jetboat:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IRypaEyXaOM

Or, the Water 38, which has captured a significant (and growing) part of the Mediterranean dayboat market:

https://youtu.be/anXRipq-_fM

Just launch a flare if you’d like further details on any of the above. For Zeelander’s in particular, I have just updated delivery and availability info. There are opportunities out there for you, but this is definitely one of my patented “you snooze, you lose” situations.

Thanks, and enjoy!

Big Wave Dave

From Newport to Cannes, to … Newport?

I. Summer in Newport

I am so pleased to report that our Zeelander Yachts “pop-up” boat show last month in Newport Harbor was a wonder and a joy – an [almost] living, breathing example of the “If it ain’t Dutch, it ain’t much” dynamic.

We had a brand new Zeelander 72 available for sea trials all weekend. Here she is, directly in front of a brand new Dutch “Mystery Ship,” and behind her smaller siblings, the Zeelander 55 and Z44. All in all (except for some pea-soup fog) it was a fabulously successful event.

I venture to say you are going to see a lot more of these pop-up, invitation-only events from more high-end boat builders. Builders are taking increasingly closer looks at their “bang for the buck” returns from traditional “big-box” boat shows.

As attendees, you’ve seen it all first-hand. Shows have gotten so big (think Miami, or Fort Lauderdale), that builders are finding it increasingly hard to make their quality products stand out in the marketplace. And even more importantly, among the crowds they struggle to provide you with the quality viewing and buying experience you deserve. So you can expect to see far more private, invitation-only showings like ours. In fact, this year and next you may be surprised about which high-end builders choose to skip the big box shows altogether. A brave new world….

I mentioned above that our pop-up was a “fabulous success.” Well, here is how I measure success:

We sold hull #2 of the new Zeelander 72!

I am pleased to say that she will be berthed in Connecticut next season. And that in anticipation of your order, Zeelander will be starting construction on hull #3 as you read this!

You can view an informative video review of this amazing yacht right here:

https://youtu.be/JfNChyl3HNU

And if you’d like to really poke around her, here’s a fun virtual tour:

The Virtual Tour

So, that brand new Dutch mystery yacht, immediately aft of our Zeelander line in Newport? She be Scout, a Hakvoort 64 meter explorer-class yacht:

I last saw her in the Haakvoort yard a couple of years ago, where she had been sort of …. abandoned? Her Russian owner-to-be had defaulted mid-build, so she sat for a while until her current Palm Beach owner could finish the project to his highly-customized liking:

https://youtu.be/edIIraSLFt4

It was a thrill to see Scout’s before and after, and I give great kudos to Hakvoort for riding the someway bumpy Scout project out right to her final home port. The Hakvoort yard, by the way, is in North Holland, not far from my friends at Wajer Yachts (it’s pronounced “Wire“).

I stopped in to see that factory a few weeks ago, as I wanted to get a better handle on the Wajer build process. Unlike most builders I know, they choose not to use subcontractors. Management explained to me that they are willing to take on higher labor costs, as they feel quality is better guaranteed by in-house staff! I was very impressed, particularly by their Wajer 55:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PZGYiRjpBsc

Last year at the HISWA show in Lelystad, Holland I saw the W55’s oh-so-innovative fender system. I expect that this will certainly get your attention:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ivn6AQpT9Ec

The Wajer Yachts motto is “Without a worry in the world.” I can’t think of a better representation of the entire Dutch approach to building quality yachts.

II. Fall in Cannes

I’ll be in Cannes on September 10th for the show’s opening, and I hope you will meet me there. What draws me there, however briefly, is to see and show two steel yachts that loyal readers of The Fog Warning have been following with me for some time: The Hartman Yachts Livingston 24, and the AvA Yachts Kando 110.

The Livingston 24 has just this week made its way from Holland to the south of France:

Hartman Yachts Livingston 24 entering Nice Harbor
Anchored at Cap Ferrat

I would delight in showing you this amazing yacht at Cannes. Just launch a flare for an appointment. Until then, the full listing can be seen here:

The Livingston 24 Yachtworld Listing

Later that day I will be aboard a yacht I have been following from the time her deck was first layed in Antalya, Turkey – The Kando 110:

Aluminum Deck to Steel Hull!

This will the first time I’ll see her afloat. Why not share this Cannes adventure with me? Just launch that flare…

III. Back to Newport!

From Day One of Cannes, I race back to Newport for Day One of the Newport Boat Show, which runs from September 12th through the 15th. The lineup there? Exactly what you saw (or missed!) at our July pop-up event: The Zeelander 72, 55, and 44:

To jump from one Zeelander to another, in size order, is a fabulous experience. Regular attendees at the Newport Show know how crazy the crowds can get. So please call me for a private viewing of these three spectacular yachts early or late on show days.

So, as usual, loyal readers, I’ve spanned the globe to bring you the finest yachts to be found anywhere. And for one of those yachts, I’ll leave you now with my final “mood piece,” one that I hope sets a tone for our next get-together in Cannes or Newport:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0n0FbzLJm5A

Thanks, and enjoy!

“Big Wave” Dave

April 13th, for all you father’s-of-the-brides!

Your Special Newport Opportunity

Short of a full blown boat show, I can’t think of a more exciting yachting opportunity for my US clients in 2019 than this one:

From June 20th through the 26th I will be presenting THREE Zeelander models, side by side for your viewing and sea-trialing pleasure at Pier 41 in Newport, RI!

First up, the just launched Zeelander 72, in her first USA appearance:

If this virtual tour doesn’t light your fire, I’d genuinely like to know what will!

Zeelander 72 Virtual Tour

For a wider discussion of what she can do for you, check this out:

The digital brochure!

  • Next up, the best-selling Zeelander 55:
https://youtu.be/0n0FbzLJm5A
  • And finally, the Zeelander 44, just awarded the Motor Boat and Yachting 2019 Boat of the Year prize in their Superboat division:

You can read all about that award (against some very tough competition) here:

Zeelander 44

As I said, a rare and impressive opportunity to see and run three yachts that I honestly consider among the finest yachts afloat. Please call or write me now to schedule your quality time. Because, as you’ve heard me say many a time, You Snooze, You Lose!

Big Wave Dave

The fast, the blue, and the custom…

This week, loyal clients and readers, we go through three iterations of fine yachts – The fast, the blue, and the custom!

Fast Boats!

I’ve run a couple of big boats (+20 meters) at 50 knots and more, and what they all had in common was their drivetrains: Surface-drive propulsion. If you want to drive a big boat fast, with reasonable accommodations and tolerable decibel levels, surface drives (commonly known as Arneson drives) are an obvious solution.

Here’s a fairly typical example – a Pershing 64 at 47 knots:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Sb-bNjE1r1k

As you’ll see here, there’s a lot of hardware at play with these drives:

The engineering is complicated, as shown here in comparison with straight shaft drives:

In my experience, these drives do work as advertised. But as in all things nautical, there are costs and tradeoffs. For example:

  • The boat must be designed and built for them up front. They can’t be retrofitted to an existing boat. In particular, transom shape and engine room size and layout (particular for the transmissions) must be custom designed and built for these drives.
  • Most applications have little or no capacity for trimming at speed. That means be prepared for some wet and rough rides.
  • Handling in reverse can be an “all-hands-on-deck” maneuver. I’ve done it. Trust me, you don’t want to.

Whatever the tradeoffs, many military vessels use these drives routinely. When you have to go 50+ knots, you do what you gotta do.

Now, we have just this month launched our Zeelander 72 (hull #1), with triple 1200 IPS drives! Click away for a great video of her very first sea trial. Listen carefully and you’ll hear the whir of press cameras clicking away:

Zeelander 72 Sea Trial #1!

 

And, as you’ll see here, she hit her design speed on there very first run!

The Proof

While 43 knots is some 10% less than surface drive installations, I will share with you here and now a little known industry secret – 43 knots is as fast as an IPS boat is allowed to go! Why, you might ask? Because….

IPS drives are speed-governed by the engine manufacturers!

Yup, the powers-that-be do not permit IPS-driven boats to exceed 43 knots in speed.

Why? Concerns about high speed prop cavitation.

And since all designs must be pre-approved by the engine manufacturers, it’s just not going to happen. In fact, builders who so much as modify the propellors will lose their build license. 

So, 43 knots it is, and 43 knots is what our Zeelander 72 delivers!

Here she is the day before her launch:

Zeelander 72

And here is the big news: I would be delighted to demonstrate this performance to you in person, in New York!

On June 22, 2019 hull #1 will be in Manhattan for a major press event, and a small number of sea trials are available for my clients. Please call me quickly for a reservation, as I expect slots will go fast. As in, 43-knots fast!

Blue Boats!

They’re referred to by many names – lobster boats, down east boats, and, as I hear at boat shows all the time, “those Hinckley-looking things.” Whatever you call them, they have been the main focus of my career for the past twenty years. Long time readers of The Fog Warning and The Vicem Report know that my preferred term is its single word permutation – “downeast” boats. But the inside-baseball term many in our industry like to use is Blue Boats. It’s easy to see why, as 95+% of them are Awlgrip Code “Flag Blue.” But there are exceptions! We’ve all seen some orange ones:

Mochicraft

Some yellow ones:

Hinckley 43

and striking “Sea Foam” versions, like Ojala, our 2011 Vicem 80 listing:

Vicem 80 – Ojala!

 

But for me the most historic model was the one that broke the color mold wide open among “blue boats” – Magpie, that amazing bright red yacht built up in Maine by Lyman Morse in 2006:

Magpie, by Lyman Morse

The owner of Mahagany Rose, our Vicem 67 brokerage listing, is from Maine. He was lucky enough to see Magpie’s inaugural cruise, and was wholly captivated by her red hull. When it came time to build his second Vicem (after his Flag Blue Vicem 52 Flybridge), he asked for “Magpie Red.” And that’s what he got!

Mahogany Rose – Vicem 67

That was ten years ago, about the lifespan of an awlgripped hull. When the time came to repaint her, he of course stuck with his favorite color. That paint job is now finishing up now, down in Charleston:

So if you have been waiting to see Mahogany Rose, you will be able to see her in all of her glory in two weeks. Please call me for an appointment. I promise a very special viewing of this very special yacht.

Here’s the complete listing:

Mahogany Rose Listing


Custom Boats!

The Zeelander 72, as you can see in New York on June 22nd has a striking new interior, quite different from what you have seen on previous Zeelanders. For example, here is the traditional Zeelander interior, as seen on our Z55:

Now here is our new Zeelander 72 (professional photography to follow in couple of week. Thanks for your patience):

 

This brighter, lighter interior will be a hit, I’m sure. But of course the traditional Zeelander interior will always be available, as will custom work of any kind.

For example, here are three artist impressions of alternative looks for the Zeelander 164‘s salon. Each of these approaches can be applied to your new Zeelander 55 or 72 as well:

On the subject of lighter and brighter, let’s talk about Ojala, our Vicem 80 listing. Vicem’s traditional interior, based around a dark and rich mahogany interior, is known worldwide. But it is not for everyone. For those who wanted a more European look, a lighter touch that shines on cloudy, dark days –  Vicem created this special look:

If this yacht rings your chimes like it does mine, I urge you to meet me in Miami and see her with your own eyes. You can find the complete listing below, but first, in answer to the many questions that have come in over my transom, here’s how the Vicem 80 compares to the Vicem 72:

For the full listing, click away:

Ojala, 2011 Vicem 80

Your Kando Update!

My final observation this week on that most unique of custom builds is an update on the Kando 34M project in Antalya. This is the one that occupies my dream life! She is currently “splash minus 42 days” away from her launch, and her hull color has now been decided upon, as seen here:

My final observation this week on custom builds is an update on that striking Kando 34M project in Antalya. This is the one that occupies most of my dream life! She is currently “splash minus 42 days” away from her launch, and her hull color has now been decided upon, as seen here:

Here are some photos taken just this week:

I will be there for her June sea trials, and then again at the Cannes Boat Show in September for her world premier. In the words of my high school classmate (John Dewey High School, Class of 1975) Academy Award winner Spike Lee:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2GNn9mJBdK0

The truth is that back in high school we knew him as Shelton Lee. But in any event, please, baby, please join me at either of these exciting milestones in modern yachting!

And some final words….

I leave you with this, loyal clients and readers – a photo from my daughter’s wedding a few weeks ago. All I will say is this –

Do as I say, not as I did!

Tried, and failed….

Thanks for cruising with me, one and all. Any questions or comments, just launch that flare!

Big Wave Dave

Your Globe-circling Report

I have returned! With four cities and ten boats over five days under my jet-lagged belt, I’d like to share with you some of what I learned. Feel free to skim through until you find something you like, and trust that I’ll tie up all its diverse threads in a bow for you at the end of this post.

I. First Stop – The Hague!

Midway between Amsterdam and Rotterdam, I spent the day at the home of my wonderful “little” pocket yachts – Long Island Yachts:

The Long Island Yachts 40 Classic

You’ll see below that the LIY factory is humming along nicely. Having sold 80+ of these wonderful boats in Europe, I am convinced they can handle the US market with skill and dependability.

 
Cranking them out!
Ignore the smiling faces, and check out the gleaming gelcoat. A top-notch job!

I am so pleased to announce here for the first time that LIY is sending me a 33 Classic demo boat for the coming season! You’ll find this lovely beauty at my dock in Shelter Island this summer, and in harbors from Montauk to Essex. I look forward to showing you what she can do, but until then, enjoy this video and call me for pricing and availability.

 

https://youtu.be/bQmeZjShwLo
Long Island Yachts 33 Classic

II. The Zeelander 72 Launch

I was honored to be among Holland’s yachting elite for the launch party of Zeelander’s greatly anticipated 72. It was … incendiary! I’ve seen launches like this at Cannes and Monaco, but never a party of this scale at a factory.

Trust me, professional photography and videography will follow at length, but here are some early views to tide you over until then:

Almost 150 square feet of extended outdoor space
The Z55, Z44, and the Z72

You can see full coverage of this party, with additional photos right here:

https://www.zeelander.com/zeelander-z72-yard-launch-vip/

I spent a full day exploring this fine yacht, and here are my observations:

Long time readers know that 72’ yachts are the most common models I have sold – at least six or eight of them, from several builders, all with traditional straight-shaft power trains. It’s a footprint I know intimately!

The Zeelander 72 changed my space-planning expectations. The interior volume that intelligent IPS engine installations provide is just remarkable. Her total living area almost approaches that of my Vicem 85 model (albeit in a narrower beam). 

This was clear just about every place I looked:

  • Her master cabin is positively huge. The only time I’ve seen so much “empty” space around built-in furniture is on larger, mid-cabin master cabin yachts.
  • Although not terribly clear on the layout plan, she even has a walk-in closet to starboard.
  • Notably, each of the two guest cabins are quite large, almost the size of master cabins on many 58’ boat yachts.
  • What’s more, shower areas, often a space sacrifice in boats this size (particularly European builds), are voluminous here. 
  • Exterior space, particularly with what I estimate is a 150 square foot extended swim platform, is almost ridiculous! For entertaining, this boat could easily absorb a 20+ person cocktail party. 


My design quibbles are just two or three in number, and they are minor. Please feel free to reach out to me privately and I’d be happy to share them with you.

A brief discourse here, loyal readers, about global markets, and what they can mean for you….

Aboard the JUST SOLD Zeelander 55. Details below

Careful readers will note at the bottom of each page icons for the Russian and Chinese versions of The Fog Warning. They are becoming much-used services. How much so?

Currently 9% of all readers of The Fog Warning worldwide are from Russia!

3% are from China, by the way. But I’m working hard on increasing that number.

The Russian market is booming, and I find those clients to be among the most yacht-savvy boaters I have met. Case in point, the Zeelander 55 I’m shooting above has just been sold to a client in Russia. Here she is, the very next day, on her way to points east:

To continue this multi-lingual thread, in the last month I have received two inquires from the UAE about Ojala, our Vicem 80 listing:

Those inquiries have spurred me to add an Arabic version of The Fog Warning, and interested readers can find that new icon at the bottom of each page as well.

My point here, loyal readers and yacht owners, is that The Fog Warning’s global reach can be a huge asset in the sale of your fine yacht. Please call me to find out how my global reach can find a new home for your yacht.

OK, back to my Vicem 80! The number one question I receive about this yacht (formerly known as the Vicem 75, before the swim platform length was added to its overall measurement) is how she differs from the best-selling Vicem 72. Well, that is now an easy question to answer. You’ll see here how just a bit more length and a bit more height allows a comfortable fourth cabin to fit in nicely:

V72 vs. V75/80

The full listing for this Vicem 80 can be found below. And if you are coming to the Palm Beach Boat Show next week, I’d be happy to meet you in Miami to explore her together. I’d say she is certainly worth your time:

https://www.yachtworld.com/boats/2011/vicem-80-flybridge-3515047/?refSource=standard%20listing

You will find me on D – Dock at the Palm Beach Show, under the Northrop & Johnson flags. I will be aboard the Zeelander 55 from March 28th through the 31st. I look forward to showing her to you there. But until then, this will have to suffice:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RK93b-vS47I

III. On to Istanbul!

I spent a great day with my friends from Vicem Yachts in Istanbul. I saw their almost done 68 Cruiser coming together, and you’ll be able to see her for yourself at the fall shows:


Vicem 68 Cruiser

Vicem is having an impressive line of yachts at the Palm Beach Show. They’re having a cocktail party on Thursday night, and you’ll see me there!

IV. And Finally, to Antalya

Antalya is a stunning historic Roman harbortown in the far south of Turkey. It is one of my favorite places on the planet, which is why this was perhaps my tenth trip there. It’s a sleepy, Mediterranean kind of place, as evidenced by my canine friend here:

I returned to Antalya to meet with AvA Yachts, the builder of the striking Kando line of go-anywhere steel/aluminum yachts.

They are finishing up hull #1 of the kendo 110, set to splash in six weeks:

And, I saw that they are two months in to hull #2, destined to deliver to NBA star Tony Parker in nineteen months:

In the end they will both look like this:

But they will have very different layouts. #1 is a five-cabin model, with the master cabin in the bow:

Five-cabin, master bow

To each his and her own, of course. But personally, I have a thing for aft-cabin masters. By putting the master cabin on the aft deck, you get an enormous “porch” at the foot of your bed, presenting wonderfully romantic “sunsets-in-bed.” After all, in the end ain’t it all about the romance?

Numarine does this with their line of explorer yachts. But as you’ll see here, that back porch view will usually be blocked by tenders and water toys:

Numarine 32XP

The Kando 110 (aft master) places the tender on the front deck, preserving those unblocked bedside sunsets:

Kando 110 six-cabin, aft master

As I say, to each his and her own. That’s the thing about yacht building in Turkey – You can always have it your way, usually at minimal extra cost!

V. And Home!

Finally, back to New York, for one week. Then I’m off to Zeelander-world at the Palm Beach Show. I do hope to see you there. But I’d like to leave you with this closing thought – A top industry executive once said this (kindly!) about my success in the boat biz:

“Dave may not be the absolute best broker in the industry. And he may not be the #1 hardest working broker in the industry. But he always shows up!”

Yah, showing up is what I do. So please consider letting me show up on your behalf, my loyal readers, sellers and buyers. You know me, I aim to please. And to deliver!

Thanks, and enjoy!

Big Wave Dave

You Snooze, You Lose!

I. You Snooze, You Lose….

Ah, Baron, we hardly knew ye!

Yes, ladies and gentlemen, The Baron, our premier Vicem 72 Flybridge listing, is now under contract, and soon to make her 35-knot way to her new home.

 As a parting glance for you, my loyal readers, I leave you with the video that was watched over 31,000 times to date. My video production company really pulled out the stops for Baron, and they can do the same for any of my Fog Warning – listing clients  After all, doesn’t your yacht deserve this kind of marketing? Call me for the details.

II. And the Next Bullet in the Chamber?

I am so pleased to present to you my latest listing! Meet Ojala (Oh-hala) a truly remarkable 2011 Vicem 80 Flybridge from Key Biscayne:

Original Factory Photo

Owner’s, clients and long time readers of The Fog Warning know that Vicem’s larger Flybridge yachts are known far and near for their ability to take their family and guests just about anywhere, through just about anything, in safety and style. The only thing these models have lacked so far is a true four-cabin layout. That is exactly what Ojala delivers for you and yours:

 

I first ran this fine yacht when she splashed in Istanbul in 2011. Back then (before Vicem changed their model nomenclature to include swim platform measurements) she was known as the Vicem 75. I had the pleasure of studying her carefully for a couple of days last week, and found this yacht meets her mission of four-couple yachting superbly.

One of the many things that is remarkable about Ojala, even within the Vicem line, is her interior design choices. She was envisioned right from from her drawing board days as a yacht to showcase a lighter, European-style interior.  As Yachting Magazine said in their glowing review:

“She presents a thoroughly contemporary interior fit and finish, notable for her light anigre wood, complemented by wenge accents and trim, offset by her dark iroko sole.The combination works, and instead of jarring the senses, the interior is soothing, providing a canvas that will not compete with the scenery beyond the salon windows.”

I could not agree more. You can read the full review of this 30-knot yacht here:

Yachting Magazine reviews the Vicem 80 Flybridge

For a full video tour, click away. This was filmed before her current hull color was decided upon:

He owner’s are asking $1,790,000, and the comprehensive listing can be found here:

The Full Yachtworld Listing

Ojala means “Hopefully.” As in, hopefully I will meet you at her Key Biscayne dock for a private viewing soon. She’s not that far from Palm Beach, so if you are visiting my yachts at the boat show from March 28th through the 31st I’d happily run down and show her to you.

You know the drill, loyal readers ….. just launch a flare!

 

III. Wait….Another Bullet in the Chamber

And yet another fine yacht for your inspection! Not to be missed in Charleston is Mahogany Rose, my classic Vicem 67 listing. She has had a dramatic price reduction to $1,050,000, and is actively in search of her next owner. In two weeks her hull is scheduled to get a new paint job. If you’d like to see her just before, or just after her new look, let me know and I’m happy to give you the grand tour.

Click away for the full Yachtworld listing

 

IV. Adult Content Ahead…

The Baron video is not the only Fog Warning media to have gone viral. You may remember this Zeelander 55 video:

https://youtu.be/EBJn7Gql2jM

Well, not to be outdone, a Zeelander 55 owner in Europe suggested to me that his clip showed a better use of Zeelander’s remarkable swim platform design. He predicted that his would shortly surpass our Tango video in viewership.

Well, who am I to argue with this?

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XXZTfrlyWCM
Adult Content Warning

IV. Spanning The Globe For You

Yes, loyal readers, I’m off next week on your behalf – a three city/five day tour of some very fine yachts and their very skilled builders. First stop?

Rotterdam!

On March 15th Zeelander is proud and pleased to host the launch party of their first 72′ yacht:

To give you a sense of relative scale, here is their entire fleet:

It’s the full range of Zeelander’s offerings, and their design and build capabilities, that has made 2018 the best year in Zeelander’s history. You can read about their success here, and I invite you to ride the Zeelander wave with me:

https://www.powerboat-world.com/news/214208/Zeelander-Yachts-busy-2019-ahead

Please feel free to meet me at the Rotterdam factory on the 15th. I am assured it will be quite a party! Otherwise, I will be displaying a Zeelander 55 (sans nudes) at the Palm Beach Show at the end of March. Please let me know if you’d like some private time aboard her that week.

From there, on to…

Istanbul!

Back in the day, for almost a decade, I traveled to Istanbul perhaps eight or ten times a year. These days I try and go once or twice a year to keep up with all things yachting, to see old friends, and for the food (trust me, even in Manhattan authentic Turkish cuisine is hard to find!)

I’ve been hearing rumors that my friends at Vicem Yachts were planning something innovative and exciting in the coming year. So when they invited me over to hear the news first hand, I jumped at the chance. As someone who has been associated with this fine builder since 2004, I’m honored to be even informally included in their design, build and marketing plans. I’m sure I will be filling you in on their latest developments here on The Fog Warning.

Recently I was aboard Vicem’s latest splash, the V65 IPS. The sheer amount of interior volume and her grand sense of spaciousness surprised me. It may be the most I’ve seen in an express-style yacht. You can see a great video of her here:

https://youtu.be/BjvQqmE1eBg

Her full listing can be found below. I’ve been through her thoroughly, and have quite a lot to say. Feel free to call me if you are interested or have questions or comments.

https://www.yachtworld.com/boats/2019/vicem-65-classic-ips-3187787/?refSource=standard%20listing

And from Istanbul, on to…

Antalya!

Antalya is in the south of Turkey, some 600 miles from Istanbul. It’s built around an ancient Roman harbor, and its one of the most romantic places I know. I very excited to be returning there. This particular trip began in Cannes.

Readers may remember my stories from last September, when I took a valuable and informative trip to Holland and Cannes to expand my knowledge of steel expedition yachts.

In Cannes, I ran into a Turkish company that somehow had previously escaped my notice. AvA Yachts is a former commercial builder that has transitioned seamlessly into a builder of fine yachts. Their Kando 110 is the flagship in their line, so far. Their design team introduced me to the knowledgeable Norwegian owner of Hull #1, and he graciously invited me to sea trial her when she splashed.

Then, just a few weeks after I returned to the States, , Kando announced the sale of Hull #2, to NBA star Tony Parker:

https://megayachtnews.com/2018/12/tony-parkers-superyacht-ava-yachts-kando-110/

Click for the full article…

I’m quite curious to see both the completed #1, and the early stages of Tony Parker’s build. Here’s a great introduction to what looks to me to be a great yacht:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gA00YAShLiM

In my meetings with the company’s founder, Atilla Kuckdiker, I was reminded of that uniquely Turkish approach to yacht building, a style I long ago labeled as:

“You draw it on a napkin, and we will build it!”

So I decided to challenge them with a napkin of my own…

A mariner I’ve know for a long time, who’s nautical judgement I’ve come to trust and depend on, brought to my attention a unique megayacht design. The Ocean Alexander 112 features an especially large master cabin in her bow. This is achieved largely by means of a “duplex-style” arrangement that puts the master head one level down, with a full size jacuzzi.

I just love this innovative use of space. I asked the design team at Kando if they could do the same. In less than a week they send me their interpretation, which I find outstanding:

That is high-level yacht building, Turkish-style. And, ladies and gentlemen, that’s exactly what keeps me coming back for more!

So off I go, friends and neighbors. But as you all know, I have little life beyond my boats and my clients. So please feel free to call or write about any little thing.

Thanks for listening, and enjoy!

Big Wave Dave

 

Time and Tide…

I. The Magazine!

At least one of your holiday wishes has been granted! The Winter issue of The Fog Warning Digital Magazine has just been published on the Apple and Google App stores:

 

The winter issue contains 178 pages of cool articles and in-depth listings of featured yachts. You can subscribe to this free and engaging diversion here:

The Apple Store

or

The Android Store

Enjoy!

II. An Explorer’s Dream

The hottest sector in super yacht construction for the last five years has been heavy duty, go-anywhere explorer yachts. The reason is not hard to fathom – Explorer’s speak persuasively to the adventurer’s among us.  Big and long adventures  – the Antarctic, the Galapagos, the Norwegian fjords – these rugged and distant lands require yachts that can travel long distances safely, stay out for at least six weeks at a time (in environmentally friendly ways), yet make no compromises to luxury or comfort.

This video captures the romance of that kind of yacht, and that kind of exploration, better than any I have seen. She’s a Dutch-built steel explorer, not too different than my Amundsen 42M or Zeelander 164. You are going to watch this video more than once, so make yourself comfortable….

On your second viewing, if not your first, you probably caught at moment 2:10 one of my Dutch tender’s at work, the classically inspired Long Island Yacht 28!

 

 

Some 80+ Long Island Yachts have been built in the last eight years. Half a dozen serve as tenders to megayachts. I can’t think of a better endorsement. You can find the Yachtworld listing for this fine little yacht right here:

Long Island Yachts Runabout 28

Legend, the yacht in this video, is a converted commercial ship. My yachts, built expressly for this kind of voyage, are the Amundsen 42M:

 

 

 

And the Green-Class Zeelander 164:

 

I have quite a lot of fun information on these builds. Curious readers, dig out your flare gun!

III. “And te tide and te time…” 

As far as my research goes, those olde English words are the first recorded use, from the year 1225,  of the term we all know: “Time and tide wait for no man.” The full expression was:

“And te tide and te time þat tu iboren were, schal beon iblescet.”

It doesn’t exactly roll of the tongue. Anyone who’s read the original Chaucer can tell you that. But I do like the historical nature of it all.

Last week I made a quick trip down to Fajardo, Puerto Rico to sea trial a really special sailboat. Running back into the harbor, the wind at our backs, I was momentarily surprised to see all the yachts at anchor pointing sideways to the wind. That reminded me that moored boats follow whichever is stronger – wind or tide. Docking a boat, its a good thing to know which is going to effect you more.

Here’s a video that makes the point. I’m docking The Baron, my Vicem 72 listing in Newport, a few months before her current owner took title. It’s a pretty tight fit. Tight enough that if you turn up the volume on my son’s play by play, you’ll hear

“Doesn’t look good, I don’t think he’s gonna make it!” 

The tide was running from port to starboard, with a little more velocity than I anticipated (you’ll see it drift this 30 ton yacht a little closer to it’s neighbor than I would have liked). Here is where a good set of bow and stern thrusters really came into their own. I’ll note in advance, for the squeamish among us, that no people, animals or yachts were injured in the making of this movie:

The Baron is in Miami. If you are going to be at the Miami Boat Show next month, I would love to schedule an appointment with you:

The Baron!

IV. Robotics

I’ve been knee-deep all month in financials, analyzing comparative construction costs for yachts around the world. Globalization has made hardware and material costs virtually identical no matter where you go. Labor, of course, is the great variable. Lately, because of increasing labor costs in China, Turkey – with its newly devalued Lira – has become an extremely attractive place to build a quality yacht at a great price. Sooner or later, though, advances in robotic construction is going to narrow down these advantages wherever you choose to build.

If that sounds years away to you, it ain’t. Here’s an amazing video of how Grand Banks is using robots in Malaysia to make their production molds. The magic is scheduled nightly, when most of the staff is home with their families:

 

V. Zeelander 72, hull #1 Update

The Robb Report, and many other magazines you probably have lying around, has been covering the coming launch of our Z72 #1:

Hull #1 is on schedule to splash sometime between January 30th and February 14th.I’ll be in Rotterdam for her first sea trial, and I’d love to have you along for the ride.

Here are the latest construction pix:

Portside

Swim Platform (note the electric motor).

Starboard

The Belly of the Beast

Custom Tile Work

Ciao for now, loyal readers. And remember to subscribe to The Fog Warning Digital Magazine on the Apple and Google App stores.

Big Wave Dave

Not supposed to notice…

I. What you’re not supposed to notice…

To all whom I was lucky enough to catch up with at the Fort Lauderdale Show, thanks for your time! I can say with complete authority that no one who boarded our Zeelander 55 left unimpressed. And my clients, I am very proud to say,  are very hard to impress!

Seeing my yacht through your eyes is the most valuable education I could ask for. On the VIP day of the show, an experienced yachtsman I had met for the first time spent quite awhile going through her, as you can on VIP days. When he was done, he sat in the cockpit for a long time, drinking her in, before saying:

“I get it. She speaks to me.” 

That she did. That’s what happens when the right designer meets the right builder, and the magic begins.

The FLIBS show was perhaps my 150th over the last twenty years. I would guess I have shown my yachts to way more than 100,000 people in that time. And what these relationships have taught me is that with the finest of yachts – those created by that special magic – the first appeal is not what we we consciously see. It’s about what we feel.  Feelings like this couple evidenced in their spontaneous “flash-tango” on the Z55’s beautiful, immense swim platform:

 

That platform, by the way, operates my means of a cockpit switch mounted in the aft docking station”

 

 

As well as a handheld remote and a hidden emergency switch along the waterline reachable by a swimmer in case … well, you know.

The operation of the platform is a thing of beauty:

I’m sure you noticed at the beginning of that clip the port-side tender garage. It houses a Williams Jet Tender. It’s operation is shown here in this real-time video:

The Z55 was an eye-opener at the show. I have previously posted here a bunch of exterior photos and videos, but I now have some stupendous interior and cockpit shots:

The Master Cabin, with a TV lift in the makeup desk.

Mirror facing outward, TV facing the bed.

Stunning tile work in the master head.

VIP Cabin, forward.

Stunning woodwork, the equal of any I’ve seen coming out of Istanbul.

The Bar and TV area.

The TV, after dropping from the ceiling, of course rotates for viewing from the salon as well.

Salon table, with rotating captain’s chris for wrap-around eating for an honest eight guests.

The Salon table in its convertible bed position. Electrically operated, of course.

The cockpit table drops in the same way, making a huge sun bed:

And, ingeniously, the table also tips up 90 degrees, allowing a complete athwartship walkway, with cockpit entries to port and starboard!

 

I asked that yachtsman what our Zeelander whispered to him.  He said:

“She just …. flows.”

Flows! I was thrilled to hear that word. Because that ideal was determined up front by Zeelander. Their designers and builders challenged themselves to build a yacht with as few straight lines as possible. In the end she’s all about the curves, and they certainly do flow.  Take a moment and revisit the pix above, and this one below, and I think you’ll get my meaning. Flow is not something you expressly see. It’s not about noticing design and engineering choices. It’s something you feel. And when you do, it makes your day! And mine….

If you could not make it down to FLIBS, our Z55 is berthed in Fort Lauderdale for the next few months. She is fully available for your own special VIP viewing. Just launch a flare…

II. And Her Little Sisters

These intoxicating curves are no less evident with the “little” yachts that launched the Zeelander line: The Zeelander 44H. You will find her in motion here, and if you can find more than a handful of  straight lines, you win!

I can now announce two dramatic price reductions on two “leftover” Z44’s.  The first is a stunning 2014 model with a metallic Black Sable hull:

 

 

 

And the second is a Bentley Blue 2012 Dealer Demo at almost 40% off a new build price:

 

 

 

These two wonderful pocket yachts, currently at the factory in Holland, now need to go away. Quality trades will be considered. You can see their complete specifications on my Yachtworld listings, here:

Zeelander 44 #028 – Call for Price

Zeelander 44 #016- $795,000

By all means, call me for their stories in full. One of these belongs on your dock, and  if they won’t get you to Europe, nothing will.

III. The Holland Tour

I’ve been displaying, to no small notice, some wonderful photos of the Hartman Yachts Livingstone 24M on her Scandinavian cruise, Now, some from the Holland part of her shakedown:

 

So what then, you might ask, are we not supposed to notice about the Livingstone 24?

That’s easy – her rugged construction. It’s completely untrue, for those in the know,  to say that the blood and guts of yacht building in steel and aluminum is best left unexamined, like that old joke about the sausage factory. There is real beauty in strength, if you finish the job right! For an explorer yacht like the Livingstone 24, it’s about becoming the beast and the beauty, in that order.

You can build a myriad of rugged boats out of steel, from barges to aircraft carriers. But building them with consummate style and grace means enveloping their ruggedness with real polish and panache. That’s where the magic happens.  So here’s a glimpse of what you are not supposed to notice, in chronological order:

Tough enough for the Norwegian fjords.

 

Steel plating done.

The aluminum pilothouse.

Pilothouse attached. A welding job not for amateurs!

Finis!

Splash time.

Where it all comes together…

This wonderful go-anywhere classic is berthed about an hour outside of Amsterdam. She’s a full season yacht, of course. I’ll be in Holland on a monthly basis all winter, so please allow me to take you on your sea trial of this beastly beauty.

IV. And then there’s those tough conditions…

My final “not supposed to notice” for the week is about when fine yachts get tested in  harsh, real world conditions.  Because when the going gets tough, a great yacht delivers a ride capable enough that your family  don’t quite notice that tough sea-state.

The best example of this is The Baron, my Vicem 72 listing, effortless making her way through some serious weather at 28 knots, with nary a complaint:

She is in Miami, and can (make that should) be seen at any time.

VI. And finally…

Something I do want you to notice, loyal readers. I’d like to introduce you to my new hire. Now serving as The Fog Warning’s “Good Will Ambassador,” I am pleased to present Trout, my new Australian Shepherd puppy:

 

 

Her first performance review was OUTSTANDING! I will keep you posted as she chews through my life.

As always, thanks for rolling with me!

Big Wave Dave (and Trout)

 

If it ain’t Dutch… [Continued]

I. Portuguese for “peaceful, or gentle…”

I’ve heard it said over the years that “Northern European’s don’t do sexy.” Yachts, that is. I don’t know if that’s ever been true – after all, these are the people who brought us Zeelanders, as sexy a yacht as any I’ve seen come out of Italy:

 

But it certainly ain’t true now! I am pleased and proud to announce the fourth and last leg of The Fog Warning’s new “Group Holland” initiative:

The Sossego [Sah-SAY-go] Comfort  22


 

The Sossego line of go-fast aluminum yachts are built by the Gebroeders van Enkhuizen yard. Sossego  – a beautiful word (do what I did – get a native Portuguese speaker to say it. It pours out like melted butter). The Enkhuizen’s are right next door to the Feadship plant, in Makkum, and share many of the same subcontractors. They’ve long been known for launching some of the finest aluminum yachts (both sail and power) in all of Europe. This one, hull # 3 in the line, is as fine an example of a performance flybridge as I’ve ever run.

 

 

Running this fine yacht in the North Sea at maximum RPM, flying along at 36 knots, I was stunned at her sound engineering. I measured  just 60 decibels at full speed. If you can hear her twin MAN 1550’s in this sea trial, your ears are a lot better than mine!

It became clear to me after a couple of day in the factory that the Sossego is what you get when you combine the best of ever-skillful designer Frank Mulder’s efforts with a yard that devotes itself to empirical and uncompromising engineering, flawless construction methods, and a fine aesthetic sense:

 

 

She is currently making her way to her winter harbor in Majorca. I’d be happy to meet you there and show this fine yacht to you. Until that time, the best look at her is:

  • This clip (with some great running shots) from Dutch TV:

 Sossego Interview

  • And this virtual tour. Select “FOTO”for the best experience:

Click for Interior and exterior virtual tours!

You can see the full specifications on The Fog Warning Yachtworld page, here:

The Sossego Yachworld Listing

But… stay tuned and buckle your seatbelt, loyal readers, for some exciting information about her big sister, the Sossego 30M:

 

Meanwhile, as always, if you have any questions or comments, just launch that flare! Or find me at FLIBS at the Zeelander dock….

II. Zeelander at Fort Lauderdale

Just check this out….

Now, come check her out in person! I’ll have the latest Z55 at the Fort Lauderdale boat show. She’s a 2,000 hp beast (if a beast can be this beautiful) that hits 42 knots!

She and I will be in the Green Zone of the show – that’s on the north side, not far from the bridge. Specifically:

Green Zone, HOF FD 37A

 

I don’t have to tell you how big FLIBS is. Call me if you get lost!

I now have some big news on the smaller Zeelanders – The 44. I have two of them (that’s 88 feet of Z, people) available for immediate delivery from the factory. To give you a sense of scale, here’s a 44 next to her big sister:

 

I find that the Z44 shares that great mix of indoor/outdoor space with the Z55. I ran a Z44 in Holland last month with eight people aboard, and it swallowed us all up quite nicely.

The best way to get a sense of her spaciousness is through this virtual tour:

Zeelander 44 Virtual Tour

If you are looking for a wonderful little yacht right now, you have your choice of the Black Sable or Bentley Blue models:

 

Call me (or even better, see me aboard the Z55 at the show) and I’ll take you through the options and pricing for these two wonders. Trust me, one of them belongs at your dock this season. Let’s find a way to make that happen….

III. Long Island Yachts Runabout 40

I’m excited to talk with your today about the queen of Long Island Yachts’ fleet, their Runabout 40:

 

As I mentioned last month, Long Island Yachts of Rotterdam, Holland has a deep admiration for the looks and performance of classic American downeast designs. After great success in Europe – over 80 boats sold – they now come home to the country that inspired their classic designs.

I ran this boat in Holland last month, and found she delivers a nice balance of space both above deck and below. Below decks, you’ll find accommodations for four – a master cabin with an island bed, and the guest cabin with twin berths. You’ll also find a seating area, and a surprisingly spacious bathroom with separate shower area.

The entire interior is very nicely finished in bright teak and an attractive off-white finish.

 

 

The helm station offers a purely classic design, but with a state of the art dashboard:

 

 

The dinette is well protected by the windscreen, with a functional galley opposite. The spacious aft cockpit offers seating for six.

The deep V hull of the Long Island 40 Runabout is designed to travel comfortably at high speed. Her standard engines are straight shaft twin Yanmar 315’s. Upgrading to the optional twin Volvo IPS 600 enables the boat to reach speeds of over 40 knots.

You can see the full specifications (and her attractive pricing) on The Fog Warning Yachtworld page, here:

The 40 Runabout Yachtworld Listing

You will also find there exciting information on the rest of the Long Island Yachts line:

Including their 33’s:

 

Their 28:

 

And their 25’s:

 

 

 

As always, if you’d like to hear the full story, just launch that flare (and find me at the show).

III. All Work and No Play…

On the way back from the Annapolis Show I stopped in DC to see an exhibit I first read about in the Wall Street Journal. The National Gallery has put on a stunning exhibit entitled:

Water, Wind, and Waves: Marine Paintings from the Dutch Golden Age

I found it just exceptional, of interest to anyone who loves boats and boating. I learned that in the 17th century,  maritime art for the Dutch was their “Hollywood” entertainment. Here are some examples of what you’ll see (but only if you hurry! The show closes on November 25th):

 

My new best friend, Miss Google Analytics, tells me that of all the pages I’ve published on The Fog Warning, month in and month out the number one hit is …. “About The Painting.”  That’s the rather academic video atop my home page that educates us all on Winslow Homer and his iconic painting (and mine) – The Fog Warning.

Given that popularity, I am compelled to post his as well, the National Gallery’s talk on this wonderful and entertaining exhibition. Enjoy!

IV. Let’s Be Careful Out There

About fifteen years ago I was representing a small Turkish builder called Dereli Yachts. They build a neat jet boat called The Daytripper 40, and I sold my share:

If you watch the video carefully, you’ll note two things:

  • She was a truly beautiful yacht.
  • And, she ran sort of bow up.

Visibility was an issue here.  One client of mine solved the problem by adding a full blown tuna tower, with a second helm station twenty feet off the deck! But I found one night on Long Island Sound that in zero visibility weather, trim is of secondary importance.

My job was to bring the D40 from Huntington N.Y. to Newport RI for the boat show. But I got stuck waiting for an engine part, and couldn’t leave with the rest of the fleet. At 6pm I began the 120 mile run to Newport, budgeting four hours at 30 knots. Then the squalls hit….

An hour after sunset, heavy rain and wind made it an entirely instruments-only delivery. The rain was hard enough that the automatic tuning of the radar wasn’t optimal, and I had to play around with my own settings. It made no difference at all (there be nothing to see) but I left the windshield wipers running the whole time. More about that later, my friends…

Fortunately,  radar showed that there weren’t many boats out on Long Island Sound that night. A scattered freighter or two, and the ferries out of Port Jefferson and Orient Point. But running on full instruments,  those blips got every ounce of my attention. In the end, at 15 knots, it took about six hours to get to the dock in Newport. I was a little frazzled.

Returning to the boat early the next morning,, I found that sometime during the trip I had thrown the helm-side wiper blade. The steel retaining clip, arching back and forth hour after hour, had etched a perfect (an deep) half-moon scratch in the glass. Trust me, it looked a lot worse than this:

The entire windshield had to be replaced. A very expensive lesson.

It’s not like running those wipers added any value. We’ve all seen, even in daylight, how heavy rain (or seas) overwhelms most wipers.  This is why I’m a big fan of what you’ll find on commercial boats (and more and more on expedition yachts): Bladed high-speed circular ports. These suckers will cut through anything:

Looking back on this trip now, and remembering how stressed I was tracking those ferries,  I wish my radar had a MARPA option. MARPA was an expensive “black box” option (I can’t even find a picture of it now)  allowing you to mark and track individual targets over ever-changing collision courses. It was clunky, and it required some training and practice to use it effectively.  But at the time it was state of the art.

When I started selling boats in the late 90’s there were still plenty of older boats with green screen radars. Remember this?

These  were limited in the their displays (split screens were a generation or two away) and integrated badly (if at all) with chart plotters. Which is why delivery captains always had one of these in their travel bag:

 

Yup, you tracked targets changing vectors with a grease pencil, marking up the radar screen. Post-It notes helped for range and distance:

A pilot told me that air traffic control back in that era wasn’t much more sophisticated. Here’s how they did it:

Well, we’ve come a long way, baby!

On a foggy morning last month in Holland I helped take a stunning Dutch explorer yacht out into the North Sea. The dykes in the area were 14 feet high, and significant traffic control was necessary to safely approach the locks. I counted twenty targets  converging upon the lock passageway, over 270 degrees of horizon. Plus, of course, a steady stream of traffic was coming in from the other side. But collision avoidance is much easier now than it used to be.

The explorer was equipped with Raymarine’s new Quantum 2 CHIRP radar, with Doppler processing. Every single target was automatically identified and tracked, with clear indications of whether they were heading towards or away from us. Here’s how it works:

All I’ll say is I wish I had this on that squall-heavy trip to Newport!

OK, one and all, I’ve got a plane to catch. You know the drill – need anything, dig out your flare gun. And let me show you the Zeelander 55 at the show. I will be there full time, except for scheduled appointments to show The Baron, my Vicem 72 Flybridge at her dock in Miami:

 

Friday appointments are all booked. But call me about availability over the show weekend. She is worth seeing!

Ciao for now,

Big Wave Dave